Tracy can't collect on both policies, so the one they're being billed for is worthless, and they never wanted it to begin with

WASHINGTON -- Thousands of America's wounded - http://www.blogrollcenter.com/index.php?a=search&q=America%27s%20wounded warriors are being forced to pay for 바카라사이트 - http://homeforbrands.com/ life insurance they don't want -- and can't even use.

In 2007, six weeks after Matt and Tracy Keil were married, he was shot in the neck by a sniper in Iraq.

"I currently have no feeling from the chest down or movement either but I am able to move my left arm," Matt said.

"It changed everything," said Tracy. "It was nothing other than love that was the same."

They were doing as well as could be expected, raising 7-year-old twins, until last February when they received a letter. It said they owe $12,791.14 in unpaid premiums on a life insurance plan Matt didn't realize the Pentagon had automatically issued to him when he left the army.

That's because Matt is already covered by a free life insurance policy from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Tracy can't collect on both policies, so the one they're being billed for is worthless, and they never wanted it to begin with.

"We were automatically enrolled into the program at the highest level of coverage," Tracy said.

Matt went online to figure out how that happened. He found a form that says "automatically covered at the maximum rate" unless he submitted a form declining the coverage.

At the time, Matt says he was on his back "paralyzed from the neck down, hooked up to a ventilator."

Future premiums will be taken out of his disability check.

"I don't understand why I'm being forced to pay into a program that I ultimately can't benefit from or that my wife can't benefit from," Matt said.

He's one of 19,000 disabled veterans who received the letter from the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS), which handles all of the Pentagon's financial transactions.

"We're angry. We are very angry," Tracy said. "But it's not just about us."

On Facebook, 260 veterans have joined a group comparing how much they owe and how much is being taken out of their disability checks.

"We're all trying to figure this out," Tracy said.

The bills for unpaid premiums range from $1,000 up to nearly $29,000, and the monthly deductions start as low as $16 and go up to $389. Matt's disability check is being docked at $137.20.

"My life's hard enough. I had to fight every step of the way for everything I've had. Now I'm fighting for something that I don't want to be part of and never thought I was," Matt said.

It is possible under certain circumstances to drop the life insurance. Some members of the Facebook group have sent in a termination notice, but been told they used the wrong form. Matt and Tracy Keil are still waiting for a response.

Researcher Jim McDonough, a physiological psychologist, said that would be much higher than the level that the Pentagon says veterans were exposed to from the Khamisiyah depot destruction

In separate Army-sponsored studies, scientists observed behavioral problems, brain changes and immune system suppression in the animals many days after exposure to doses that caused no immediate effects, such as convulsions or pupil constriction.

Both studies involved rodents, and "that's a big leap to human beings," said Melinda Roberson, a behavioral neuroscientist involved in a study still under way.

Even so, the studies provide new information in an area where a lack of research has made it impossible to conclude whether Gulf veterans' illnesses are linked to low-level sarin gas exposure.

"They are pushing back the frontiers of biological effects of low levels of sarin. The evidence is building," said Dr. Francis O'Donnell, a medical consultant for the Defense Department who helps track Gulf War illness research.

Veterans of the 1991 war have suffered from various illnesses they believe linked to their service in the Gulf. Symptoms include chronic fatigue, diarrhea, migraines, dizziness, memory problems, loss of muscle control and loss of balance.

Most scientists have blamed stress. Some veterans attribute the health problems to toxic substances - http://photobucket.com/images/toxic%20substances they encountered in the Gulf, including sarin, a toxic chemical weapon that is lethal at high levels. Others suggest it may be a combination of the factors.

The Pentagon has identified about 130,000 troops it believes were exposed to low levels of sarin in 1991 when U.S. forces destroyed a weapons depot at Khamisiyah in southern Iraq. Some veterans believe other sarin exposures occurred.

On its Web site, the Pentagon tells veterans that "current medical evidence indicates that long term health problems are not likely."

Dr. Robert Haley, an epidemiologist at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, has published almost two dozen studies suggesting that some Gulf War veterans' illnesses are linked to brain damage resulting from exposure to toxins such as sarin.

The Pentagon criticized those studies, in part because veterans Haley studied were not downwind of Khamisiyah when the depot was destroyed. Haley said the new research gives "biological plausibility" to his suggestion of a link to sarin gas exposure.

The study on guinea pigs is under way at the Army Medical Research Institute for Chemical Defense at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Its preliminary findings were presented in November at the Society for Neuroscience's annual meeting in Washington.

In that study, https://www.yhosl0x4z.online - https://www.yhosl0x4z.online guinea pigs were injected with nerve gas five days a week for two weeks. Some were injected with 20 percent of the dose required to kill half the animals and others with 40 percent of that dose.

Researcher Jim McDonough, a physiological psychologist, said that would be much higher than the level that the Pentagon says veterans were exposed to from the Khamisiyah depot destruction. Some veterans' groups question the accuracy of the Pentagon's exposure estimates, insisting they were much higher. Other researchers say there is no way to calculate the exposure levels for sure.

Although veterans were not injected with sarin, McDonough said the biochemical effects on the brain are the same for either exposure method. He likened the exposures to nicotine's effects on the brain whether the nicotine is smoked, chewed or delivered through a skin patch.

The exposed animals were examined after two hours, then at three days, 10 days, a month and 100 days. There were no changes in some physical signs the scientists monitored, such as weight gain and temperature.

But researchers said they found significant increases in certain behaviors.

For example, 100 days after exposure, animals in the 40 percent dose group spent significantly more time in the center of their activity chambers and traveled greater distances in the chambers, McDonough said. Guinea pigs in both dosage level groups also reared up on their hind legs significantly more often at 100 days.

Roberson said researchers saw a reduction in activity by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, a key to controlling electrical impulses in the brain. She said that could affect behavior. Researchers are exposing another group of animals to verify the results.

Separately, researchers at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute in Albuquerque, N.M., known for its tobacco studies, exposed mice to low-level doses of sarin in a three-part Army-funded study. The study, begun in 1998, was finished last year.

The mice inhaled sarin doses an hour a day for five days and an hour a day for 10 days. The levels were one-tenth and one-twentieth the concentrations required to kill a human. The mice were examined a day and a month after exposure.

Researchers found that the exposures, particularly when combined with heat stress, caused both decreases and increases in the numbers of receptor sites in areas of the brain critical for cognition and memory, "things that might be associated with Gulf War syndrome," said Rogene Henderson, Lovelace senior scientist.

Receptor sites are essentially docking stations for brain signals. In some cases the changes did not appear until a month after exposure, Henderson said.

Researchers found that the exposure also suppressed the immune system, the body's defense mechanism against infection and disease. Researcher Mohan Sopori, an immunologist, said that indicates something happened to the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for the body's automatic functions such as sleeping and bowel movements.

By Suzanne Gamboa

Buzz Briefs: Timberlake, Beauvais

Memphis-native Justin Timberlake has made two separate donations of $100,000 each to the Memphis Rock 'n' Soul Museum and the Memphis Music Foundation.

Timberlake, who was in Memphis for filming on the independent movie "The Open Road," presented the checks to the two groups on Thursday at the museum.

Timberlake, 27, who grew up in the Memphis suburb of Millington, became a star as part of the boy band 'N Sync.

He has since become a best-selling solo artist and appeared in movies, including "Black Snake Moan" by Memphis writer-director Craig Brewer.

Timberlake said in a statement he donated the money because music education and keeping Memphis' music legacy vibrant are important to him.

Actress Garcelle Beauvais-Nilon On The Cover Of Playboy

2Actress Garcelle Beauvais-Nilon believes beauty comes with age.

That's probably why, at age 40, the actress and former fashion model best known for her role as ADA Valerie Heywood on NYPD Blue was not uncomfortable doing a nude pictorial for Playboy.

"I knew I was trying to get pregnant," Beauvais-Nilon told JET Magazine. "I said who knows how my body will look, maybe we should document this now. I wasn't doing this for anyone other than to prove I could do it. Then they offered the cover, which they don't normally do for Black women. That made itcredible."

Beavais-Nilon is on the cover of JET Magazine this week. She dishes her staying sexy secrets in the issue on stands Monday.

British Singer Corinne Bailey Rae's Saxophonist Husband Found Dead

3The husband of Grammy-nominated British singer Corinne Bailey Rae has been found dead.

Police say Jason Rae was found in an apartment in the northern English city of Leeds on Saturday. Officers are awaiting results of toxicology tests to determine the cause of death.

A 32-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of supplying him with drugs but has been released on bail, officials said.

Thirty-one-year-old Jason Rae was a saxophonist with a funk band, the Haggis Horns.

Corinne Bailey Rae's self-titled debut album sold more than 1 million copies in the U.S. after its release in 2006.

The 29-year-old was nominated for song of the year at the Grammy Awards in both 2007 and 2008.

New CNN Headline News Program To Poke Fun At Clips In Film Archive

CNN Headline News isn't the first place you'd look for comedy, but the network says it will try to have fun with some of the clips in its news archives.

"Not Just Another Cable News Show" will premiere April 5, the network said Monday.

"It's an entertaining way to recall some of the more memorable moments captured on video," said Ken Jautz, executive vice president at CNN Worldwide.

The 30-minute show will be on Saturdays at 7 p.m. EDT, then repeated twice later in the evening. It will be followed each time by "News to Me," a series that shows hot Web videos.

The sober CNN has avoided such light material in the past.

A few years ago, CNN International aired reruns of Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" for overseas viewers.

Pam Anderson's Hubby Gives The Green Light To Annulment Request

4Rick Salomon - who has become something of a specialist in short relationships with celebrities - agrees with his wife Pamela Anderson that their two-month marriage should be voided, according to court papers filed Friday, March 21, 2008.

In papers responding to a filing by Anderson, Salomon agreed - http://www.zixiutangpollencapsules.com/?s=Salomon%20agreed that the marriage should be annulled based on "fraud," though neither set of documents elaborated. Salomon did not ask for spousal support in the papers, and asks that it not be awarded to Anderson.

According to Us Magazine, Pam Anderson spent Easter Sunday with ex-husband Tommy Lee in Malibu, California.

The former couple has two sons, Brandon, 11, and Dylan, 9, from their 1995-1998 marriage. The family went to the movies and had lunch at Geoffrey's, Us reported.

Grammy Winner Emilio Navaira In Critical Condition After Bus Crash

5Grammy-winning Tejano singer Emilio Navaira was critically injured Sunday when his band's bus crashed on a highway in the metro area, city and hospital officials said.

Navaira and his band Rio had performed at a Houston nightclub on Saturday night. At about 5 a.m. Sunday, the band's bus slammed into traffic barrels on Interstate 610 northbound in Bellaire, a well-to-do enclave within the city west of downtown Houston, Bellaire police Sgt. Daniel Kerr said.

Navaira was one of eight passengers on the bus who were injured, said Houston Assistant Fire Chief Omero Longoria. Navaira was listed in critical condition at Memorial Hermann Hospital, where he was being treated in the intensive care unit, said hospital administrator Lisa Lagrone.

He had surgery Sunday to remove a blood clot in his head, said Joe Casias, his agent, who was at the hospital with the hospital.

"The next 24 hours are very critical," Casias said. "....on behalf of his family, we hope his fans will pray for Emilio."

Navaira, 45, and Rio have released more than a dozen albums, including "Acuerdate" that won the 2003 Grammy for best Tejano album.

B.B. King Keeps The Blues Thriving In Mississippi Delta Hometown

B.B. King is the new owner of a juke joint in his Mississippi Delta hometown.

Mary Shepard has owned Club Ebony in Indianola for the past three decades. King and other artists have played there throughout the years.

A Mississippi Delta Blues Trail Marker outside Club Ebony says Count Basie, https://www.mdfbjfn875.online - https://www.mdfbjfn875.online Ray Charles, James Brown, Ike Turner are among the musicians who have played there since 1945.

Shepard says she sold the club to the bluesman because she wants to relax and spend time with her family.

Indianola is about halfway between Jackson and Memphis.

Dolly Parton: I'm A Great Investment

Dolly Parton knows a good investment when she sees one, and these days she sees one in the mirror.

Parton, whose business portfolio includes a theme park and an entertainment production company, says she's spending a lot of her own money trying to get back on country radio with her new CD, "Backwoods Barbie."

"I'm looking at it like an investment," she told The Associated Press. "I thought, 'I've made enough money. I can afford to invest a little in myself."'

"I purposely tailor-made this to try to get some hits," Parton explained.

The album reached No. 2 on Billboard in its second week, her best showing in 17 years.

The first single, "Better Get to Livin'," a country-pop song she describes as sonically similar to Keith Urban, sputtered at No. 48. But the second single, "Jesus & Gravity," is just now arriving at radio.

In the poll, the question about getting the smallpox vaccine was asked after a series of questions about the threat of bioterrorism, so people being surveyed may have been thinking more about the threats than about the risks of the vaccine

The survey also found an increasing number of people are worried - http://www.wired.com/search?query=worried that smallpox, wiped from the globe more than 20 years ago, will return in an act of bioterror.

People most trust their own doctors to give them correct information about how to protect themselves from disease caused by bioterrorism — although most regular doctors know little about smallpox and other rare diseases likely to result from an attack.

People are significantly less likely to trust government agencies and officials for information, suggesting the government has a big job ahead of itself to educate doctors, https://www.ghsw0e09h.online - https://www.ghsw0e09h.online who can then pass the information to their patients.

"Information about diagnosing and treating diseases used in bioterrorism needs to get to the front lines of the health system — doctors," said the report commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Among government officials, the most trusted is the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Overall, most of the public believes the nation is somewhat better prepared to handle a biological or chemical attack than it was last year, when anthrax was sent through the mail, though only a handful say the country is very well prepared.

Pollster Michael Perry attributed the heightened concern about smallpox to the increased attention it has received in the media as President Bush nears a decision about offering the smallpox vaccine to the public for the first time in three decades.

The president could make his vaccination plan public as early as this week.

"A growing number of people have moved from being uninformed about the disease and the vaccine to a state of heightened concern about the possibility of a smallpox attack," Perry said.

On smallpox, the poll found that 65 percent of people are willing to be vaccinated although it "may produce serious side effects in a small number of cases." Twenty-two percent said they would not get the vaccine, and 14 percent said they didn't know.

In May, 59 percent of people surveyed in a similar poll said they would get the vaccine.

The poll found the portion of people worried about smallpox also rose since May. Nearly six in 10 now say they are very or somewhat worried that terrorists will attack with smallpox, up from 43 percent in May.

The telephone poll of 1,002 adults was conducted Oct. 20-30. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

In the poll, the question about getting the smallpox vaccine was asked after a series of questions about the threat of bioterrorism, so people being surveyed may have been thinking more about the threats than about the risks of the vaccine.

People were not given details about the vaccine's risks: Fifteen of every million people being vaccinated for the first time will face life-threatening complications, and one or two will die.

Smallpox shots involve a number of jabs with a needle containing some live virus. This triggers serious side effects in people with deficient immune systems or skin conditions, like eczema. People who are vaccinated can transmit the disease to others if the vaccinated area is left exposed, and this adds danger to any widespread vaccinations.

CBS News Correspondent Sharyl Attkisson reported recently that the president was considering a plan that would vaccinate one million people.

In an update of national smallpox policy in November, the CDC said more limited ring vaccinations were the appropriate method for dealing with any outbreak. Ring vaccinations would provide vaccine first to people dealing with patients, then to others most at risk, and then to broader sections of the community if necessary.

Ring vaccinations would be "more desirable than an indiscriminate mass vaccination campaign," said the CDC, because of the chances of people who should not get the vaccine getting it and the logistical difficulties involved.

In a White House briefing Tuesday, spokesman Ari Fleischer refused to be pinned down on when Mr. Bush would reveal his vaccination plan.

"It's a matter that he's approached with care and deliberation. He has, I think, properly and wisely taken time to make his determinations about whether or not to proceed with any type of smallpox inoculation program or vaccine program for the American people," Fleischer said.

On Tuesday, states submitted their own smallpox vaccination plans to the federal government. These displayed a variety of approaches, from Georgia— planning shots for just 300 to 500 people — to California, which has requested 70,000 doses of the vaccine.

Also newly listed as known causes of cancer in humans are broad-spectrum ultraviolet radiation - whether generated by the sun or by artificial sources - and wood dust

Studies released this year by the National Cancer Institute and others have linked long-term estrogen use to breast and ovarian cancer, raising concerns among women who use the hormone.

A federal advisory panel recommended the hormone be listed as a cancer agent two years ago, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences made it official this week with the publication of its biennial report on carcinogens.

The report, listing substances that are known or reasonably anticipated to cause a cancer risk, was sent to Congress and released by the Department of Health and Human Services.

While the expert panel recommended that the group of hormones known as steroidal estrogens be listed as cancer risks, members observed that they have benefits as well as dangers. The substances are used in hormone replacement therapy and oral contraceptives.

The panel did not suggest banning estrogens but said officially linking them with cancer could make it more probable that physicians would discuss both risks and https://www.mgdzex49yu.online - https://www.mgdzex49yu.online benefits when discussing options with their patients.

The 10th annual cancer report brings to 228 the number of substances linked to cancer.

While the new report lists steroidal estrogens as "known human carcinogens," some of the individual steroidal estrogens had been listed as "reasonably anticipated carcinogens" in past editions.

Also newly listed as known causes of cancer in humans are broad-spectrum ultraviolet radiation - whether generated by the sun or by artificial sources - and wood dust.

The report, issued every two years, is required by Congress to help keep the public informed about substances or exposure circumstances that are known or are reasonably anticipated to cause human cancers. It does not determine - http://www.blogrollcenter.com/index.php?a=search&q=determine how great the risk is or any balancing benefits from the substances.

Added to the list were of known carcinogens were:

Twelve substances or groups of substances are newly listed as "reasonably anticipated to be human carcinogens." These include:

By Randolph E. Schmid

Rex Archer, director of the Kansas City, Mo., health department

But an Associated Press survey of states suggests wide variations in how many people they plan to vaccinate and how many hospitals they expect will participate in this first round of inoculations.

States were supposed to submit their plans for the first stage of smallpox vaccinations by Monday to the federal government. Immunizations will begin after a presidential announcement, expected in coming days, and states have been told that they'll have 30 days to deliver the shots.

The first group to be offered the risky but effective vaccine will include those most likely to encounter a highly contagious smallpox patient: people on special smallpox response teams, who would investigate suspicious cases, and workers in hospital emergency rooms.

Nationwide, federal officials have said that about a half million people were expected in this first group, but officials said Monday they now expect the numbers to be slightly lower. They now estimate that up to a half million will be offered the shots, but that some of them will decline to be vaccinated and others will be screened out because of conditions that make them susceptible to dangerous side effects.

No matter what the final number, the AP survey suggests that these shots are not likely to be evenly distributed across the country.

Georgia is planning shots for just 300 to 500 people, while Louisiana anticipates as many as 20,000. California has requested 70,000 doses of the vaccine, where Michigan is asking for just 5,000 to 7,000.

In Michigan, the state plans to offer the vaccine at only about 30 hospitals. "We don't necessarily need it in every corner or at every hospital," said Geralyn Lasher of the Michigan Department of Community Health.

Twice as many hospitals are expected to participate in Montana, https://www.ucilveqh.online - https://www.ucilveqh.online and North Dakota hopes to have at least one team of 15 vaccinated health care workers at each of the state's 46 hospitals.

In North Dakota, the state's vastness and lightly populated rural areas make it important that all hospitals are capable of helping a smallpox victim, said Tim Wiedrich, bioterrorism coordinator for the North Dakota Health Department.

"We really believe that it's likely that smallpox patients could present themselves at any of our hospitals," he said.

Federal officials plan to review the number and types of people included in each state's plan and make sure they are comprehensive, said Jerry Hauer, the top bioterrorism official at the Department of Health and Human Services. He said he's not surprised by the variation.

"We wanted to give them that flexibility," he said.

The variation partly stems from the fact that states are each making their own guesses about the chances of smallpox reappearing more than 20 years after it was declared eradicated, said Dr. Rex Archer, director of the Kansas City, Mo., health department. No one knows if smallpox will ever return, but experts suspect that hostile nations and possibly terrorist groups have the virus and could unleash it in an act of bioterrorism.

Others say that the variation among the states is likely to even out after vaccinations begin, with some states asking for more vaccine and others winding up with more than they need.

Plans being submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention address a wide range of details about the first phase of smallpox vaccinations.

States were asked to explain who would be offered the shots, timelines and locations for delivering them and a plan for ensuring those at particular risk of severe side effects do not get vaccinated.

Once the vaccinations begin, states will be required to keep detailed track of how many people suffer reactions, with reports due twice a week to the CDC.

They are climbing a logistical and medical mountain not ventured in three decades, when routine smallpox vaccinations ended in the United States as the disease waned.

It represents "one of the most complicated logistic activities any state and local agency will have to undergo," said Michael Osterholm, a bioterrorism expert at the University of Minnesota who is advising federal officials on smallpox planning.

The disease, which historically killed 30 percent of its victims, was once one of the world's most feared. At the same time, experts estimate that the vaccine will kill one or two out of every million people being vaccinated for the first time, and 15 will suffer life-threatening side effects.

The major question being debated within the White House is how fast to proceed in offering the shot to the general public.

There is widespread agreement, though, on the first stage of vaccinations. A second stage is likely to cover other health care workers and first responders, totaling as many as 10 million people nationally.

As they begin vaccinating, federal and state authorities will mount an education campaign to help people decide whether to get the shot.

In the end, each person will be forced to consider the same questions - http://www.buzznet.com/?s=questions Mr. Bush and other top federal officials have been struggling with for months, said Dr. Jimmy Guidry, state health officer for Louisiana.

"It boils down to an individual perception," he said. "Is this risk real or not?"

By Laura Meckler

keeps 28,500 troops in South Korea and another 50,000 in Japan, but says it has no intention of invading the North

The military drills, code-named "Invincible Spirit," are to run Sunday through Wednesday with about 8,000 U.S. and South Korean troops, https://www.bootdov1.online - https://www.bootdov1.online 20 ships and submarines and 200 aircraft. The Nimitz-class USS George Washington, with several thousand sailors and dozens of fighters aboard, was deployed from Japan.

The North routinely threatens attacks whenever South Korea and the U.S. hold joint military drills, which Pyongyang sees as a rehearsal for an invasion. The U.S. keeps 28,500 troops in South Korea and another 50,000 in Japan, but says it has no intention of invading the North.

Still, the North's latest rhetoric threatening "nuclear deterrence" and "sacred war" carries extra weight following the sinking of a South Korean warship that killed 46 sailors. Seoul and Washington say a North Korean torpedo was responsible for the March sinking of the Cheonan, considered the worst military attack on the South since the 1950-53 Korean War.

The American and South Korean defense chiefs announced earlier in the week they would stage the military drills to send a clear message to North Korea to stop its "aggressive" behavior.

The exercises will be the first in a series of U.S.-South Korean maneuvers - http://www.traveldescribe.com/?s=maneuvers to be conducted in the Sea of Japan off Korea's east coast and in the Yellow Sea closer to China's shores in international waters. The exercises also are the first to employ the F-22 stealth fighter which can evade North Korean air defenses in South Korea.

South Korea was closely monitoring North Korea's military, but no unusual activity had been observed Saturday, South Korea's Yonhap news agency reported.North Korea, which denies any involvement in the sinking of the Cheonan warship, has warned the United States against attempting to punish it.

"The army and people of the DPRK will legitimately counter with their powerful nuclear deterrence the largest-ever nuclear war exercises to be staged by the U.S. and the South Korean puppet forces," North Korea's official news agency in Pyongyang quoted an unnamed government spokesman as saying. North Korea's official name is the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Though the impoverished North has a large conventional military and the capability to build nuclear weapons, it is not believed to have the technology needed to use nuclear devices as warheads.

Its rhetoric regarding using nuclear deterrence was seen by most as bluster, but its angry response to the maneuvers underscores the rising tensions in the region.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced Wednesday, after visiting the Demilitarized Zone dividing the two Koreas, that the U.S. would slap new sanctions on the North to stifle its nuclear ambitions and punish it for the Cheonan sinking.

On Friday, the European Union said it, too, would consider new sanctions on North Korea.The North's Foreign Ministry said Saturday that Pyongyang will further strengthen its nuclear deterrent and again mentioned "powerful physical measures" in response to the U.S. military provocations and sanctions.

In an apparent bow to China, the George Washington will participate in the exercise in the Sea of Japan, but there are no plans for it to enter the Yellow Sea for the subsequent exercises.

China, a traditional North Korean ally, has voiced concerns that military drills in the Yellow Sea could inflame tensions on the Korean Peninsula and also fears exercises too close to its own shores could breach Chinese security.

The George Washington had been expected to join in exercises off Korea sooner, but the Navy delayed those plans as the United Nations Security Council met to deliberate what action it should take over the Cheonan sinking.

The council eventually condemned the incident, but stopped short of naming North Korea as the perpetrator.

"We are going to talk about that later," he said

The Taliban claimed Sunday that they killed a U.S. sailor and kidnapped another as NATO forces ramped up a massive search for the servicemen, who went missing two days earlier in an area held by the militants.

The coalition force set up checkpoints and distributed fliers with the sailors' pictures and are offering thousands of dollars in rewards for their return.

There were conflicting reports about whether the body of one of the two had been recovered.

U.S. and NATO officials confirmed that , after an armored sport utility vehicle was seen driving into a Taliban-held area. NATO officials were unable to say what they were doing in such a dangerous part of eastern Afghanistan.

Special Section: Afghanistan

Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid also said the pair drove into an area under insurgent control, prompting a brief gunfight in which one American was killed and the other was captured. He said both were taken to a "safe area" and "are in the hands of the Taliban."

CBS News national security correspondent David Martin reports the two sailors, members of a team training Afghans, left their base at Camp Julian near Kabul in an SUV for the relatively short drive to Camp Eggers. Their badly shot up vehicle was found 80 miles south of Kabul. Why they strayed so far and why they drove into Taliban-controlled territory by themselves — a blatant violation of security procedures — remain unknown.

Another local official, Abdul Wali, the deputy head of the provincial governing council, https://www.dfgy4di8.online - https://www.dfgy4di8.online said the Taliban sent a message through intermediaries offering to hand over the body of one sailor in exchange for jailed insurgents.

He said local authorities told the Taliban, "'Let's talk about the one that is still alive.'" He said the insurgents indicated they would have to talk to superiors before making any deal.

Mujahid, in a telephone call Sunday with The Associated Press, did not mention any Taliban demands.

"We are going to talk about that later," he said.

The Taliban did not claim responsibility for the missing sailors for more than 48 hours after the ambush. That suggested that the Friday attack was unplanned and the militants were trying to figure out how to handle it.

Later Sunday, the Taliban posted a message in English and Arabic on their website that claimed one American service member had been kidnapped in Logar and said another was killed in a shootout, according to SITE Intelligence Group. The website message included a picture of one of the fliers, showing the photo of one of the sailors, but did not say whether he was alive or dead.

According to a translation of the website message by SITE, the Taliban have one of the sailors in a "safe place" where he will not be found. The message also mentions Spc. Bowe Bergdahl, the only other U.S. service member known to be in Taliban captivity.

Bergdahl of Hailey, Idaho, disappeared June 30, 2009, in Paktika province, also in eastern Afghanistan. That area is heavily infiltrated by the Haqqani network, which has deep links to al Qaeda. He has since appeared on videos posted on Taliban websites confirming his captivity.

CBS news analyst Jere van Dyk, who was held captive by the Taliban for 45 days, can tell you exactly what it feels like.

"You're constantly afraid the door is going to open up and behind that door is going to be a man with a black turban and he's going to hold a rifle and he's going to take you outside and they're going to cut off your head," said van Dyk.

New York Times reporter David Rohde was also kidnapped in Logar province while trying to make contact with a Taliban commander. He and an Afghan colleague escaped in June 2009 after seven months in captivity, most of it spent in Taliban sanctuaries in Pakistan.

Hundreds of fliers, with reprinted photos of the two missing sailors, have been distributed throughout Logar province where NATO troops were stopping motorists, searching people, peering inside vehicles and searching trunks. The photographs show one clean-shaven sailor wearing a soft cap and another with short-cropped hair, wearing a blue civilian shirt and a white undershirt.

The fliers say: "This American troop is missing. He was last seen in a white Land Cruiser vehicle. If you have any information about this soldier, kindly contact the Logar Joint Coordination Center," run by coalition and Afghan forces. A phone number is listed along with information about a $20,000 reward being offered for information leading - http://www.shewrites.com/main/search/search?q=leading to their location.

"Our latest, accurate information reports are that they are still in the area," said Din Mohammed Darwesh, spokesman for the provincial governor of Logar.

He said the governor's office was upset because the two Americans left their base without notifying Afghan security forces in Logar, which is the normal protocol.

"This was an abnormal situation," Darwesh said.

The visiting chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, told reporters Sunday that while he did not have all the details about the missing servicemen, "from what I know right now, this is an unusual circumstance."

Mullen said he could not comment on the Taliban claim that one American was killed and the other captured. He says the U.S. was doing all it could to "return to American hands anybody who has been captured or killed."

"There's a tremendous amount of effort going on to find them, to search, and beyond that I can't discuss any additional details at this time. "It serves to remind of the challenges that we have and also the service and sacrifice that so many make, but that's really all I can talk about."

The Afghan security official who spoke on condition of anonymity claimed that the body of one of the sailors was recovered Sunday in the village of Argan in Charkh district, but a NATO official said the coalition did not have confirmation of the status or condition of either of the two.

The NATO official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to disclose the information, declined to say which base the two left from, or why they were traveling in Logar.

Samer Gul, the chief of Logar's Charkh district, said a four-wheel drive armored sports utility vehicle was seen Friday night by a guard working for the district chief's office. The guard tried to flag down the vehicle, carrying a driver and a passenger, but it kept going, Gul said.

"They stopped in the main bazaar of Charkh district. The Taliban saw them in the bazaar," Gul said. "They didn't touch them in the bazaar, but notified other Taliban that a four-wheel vehicle was coming their way."

The second group of Taliban tried to stop the vehicle, but when it didn't, insurgents opened fire and the occupants in the vehicle shot back, he said.

Gul said there is a well-paved road that leads into the Taliban area and suggested the Americans may have mistaken that for the main highway - which is much older and more dilapidated.

The security official in Logar said the Taliban fired AK-47s and machine guns at the sailors' armored vehicle and then struck the vehicle with a rocket-propelled grenade. The two then left the vehicle, and continued to return fire. The official said one sailor was killed and the other gave himself up.

Prozac side effects are similar for adults and children, including nausea, tiredness, nervousness, dizziness and difficulty concentrating, the FDA said

Psychiatrists have prescribed the world's best-known antidepressant, and similar competitors, to their youngest patients for years, despite a shortage of studies proving they work in children.

But the Food and Drug Administration declared Friday that there's finally proof that Prozac alleviates depression in children 8 years and https://www.wpuhguzrm.online - https://www.wpuhguzrm.online older, the first drug among the newer antidepressants, which boost the mood regulator serotonin, to win such approval.

Prozac's Indianapolis-based maker, Eli Lilly & Co., said it didn't intend to market Prozac for children. Still, putting child-specific information on Prozac's FDA-mandated label means more doctors, not just depression specialists, may prescribe it.

The FDA also approved Prozac's use in children with obsessive-compulsive disorder, the third serotonin-enhancing drug to win that designation.

Prozac side effects are similar for adults and children, including - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/search.html?sel=site&searchPhrase=including nausea, tiredness, nervousness, dizziness and difficulty concentrating, the FDA said.

But children have one unique side effect: In one study, children and teenagers taking Prozac grew a little more slowly - a half inch less in height and 2 pounds less in weight over a period of 19 weeks - than similarly aged children taking a dummy pill.

No one yet knows if the Prozac patients catch up or how big a concern that is, said the FDA's Dr. Russell Katz. Lilly agreed to further study the side effect.

Up to 25 percent of U.S. children and 8 percent of teenagers suffer depression, the FDA said. Additionally, about 2 percent of the population has obsessive-compulsive disorder, and at least a third of those cases began in childhood.

Psychiatrists welcomed the FDA's move.

"It made sense to prescribe these drugs, but yet everyone who did it felt a certain amount of anxiety that we didn't have all the data," said Dr. Lois Flaherty of the American Psychiatric Association.

Manufacturers have little incentive to study adult drugs in children if they expect desperate pediatricians will use the medicines - https://openclipart.org/search/?query=medicines anyway. In 1998, the FDA tried to require more pediatric testing, but a federal court recently threw out that requirement.

"So you've got 10,000 tons of fine particles

An analysis found that most of the potentially toxic dust particles collected - http://www.buzznet.com/?s=particles%20collected in the week after the attacks were too large to lodge deep in people's lungs. Only 1 percent of the dust samples was composed of finer particles, researchers said.

In addition, the chemical composition of the dust appears less toxic than originally feared.

Scientists said the dust particles were large enough that people probably coughed them out of their upper airways. But the study did not directly test whether people had deeply inhaled any of the dust.

"In terms of potential lifetime exposures, we're probably going to be very lucky in that these may not be exposures of significant health risk," said Paul Lioy, one of the authors of the report.

Lioy is associate director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, jointly run by Rutgers University and the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey.

Scientists examined the dust for Persistent Organic Pollutants, highly stable compounds that endure in the environment and can be toxic to humans and wildlife.

They said they found no evidence of high levels of two particular POPs: pesticides and https://www.netddxspk.online - https://www.netddxspk.online polychlorinated biphenyls, which were used in hundreds of industrial and commercial applications until their production was banned in 1977.

However, the team estimated that the dust contained 100 to 1,000 tons of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, a group of compounds including some that are classified by the Environmental Protection Agency as probable human carcinogens.

The report will be published in the February issue of Environmental Science & Technology. A summary of the article appears on the Web site of the American Chemical Society, which publishes the journal.

The report is unlikely to resolve all the air quality issues still swirling more than 15 months after the attacks.

The Environmental Protection Agency has come under fire from some critics who say it failed to warn rescue workers — or the general public — about the risks of breathing air near the Trade Center site in the aftermath of the attacks.

For example, on Sept. 13, 2001, the EPA said that air samples showed that lead, asbestos and volatile organic compounds " were not detectable or not of concern." CDC samples taken in October 2001 backed this up.

But since then, a report by the National Library of Medicine states, "there has been an ongoing debate about the accuracy and relevancy of the air monitoring being conducted and the overall danger of the air." One charge is that the standards employed by the EPA for their air testing were set rather arbitrarily.

In some apartments and offices the dust was three inches thick. The EPA has pledged to clean up residences throughout lower Manhattan.

Many lower Manhattan residents and rescue workers at ground zero have reported continuing respiratory problems. The dust from the collapsed World Trade Center towers was a largely a combination of pulverized glass and concrete, among other materials, that can be extremely alkaline and irritating.

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study released on the first anniversary of the attacks found that among firefighters, "the number of respiratory medical leave incidents increased five-fold during the 11 months after the attacks."

A recent report by Mount Sinai Medical Center found that half of those Ground Zero rescue and salvage workers screened required treatment for respiratory ailments.

Lioy's team took dust samples from 13 locations around the site during Sept. 12-17 last year. They did not collect any samples in Brooklyn and other areas farther from ground zero where the dust plume spread.

The smaller particles have been the focus of air quality regulations nationwide. Even in normal city air, high levels of the particles can accumulate from vehicle exhaust, pulverized sand - http://www.medcheck-up.com/?s=pulverized%20sand and dust from tires and brakes.

The director of the Environmental Research Foundation, a New Jersey-based public-interest group, said there were still enough toxic particles to cause concern.

"One percent of a million tons is 10,000 tons," Peter Montague told The New York Times. "So you've got 10,000 tons of fine particles. That's a lot."

The poll found the portion of people worried about smallpox also rose since May

The survey also found an increasing number of people are worried - http://news.sky.com/search?term=worried that smallpox, wiped from the globe more than 20 years ago, will return in an act of bioterror.

People most trust their own doctors to give them correct information about how to protect themselves from disease caused by bioterrorism — although most regular doctors know little about smallpox and https://www.sguczsce5.online - https://www.sguczsce5.online other rare diseases likely to result from an attack.

People are significantly less likely to trust government agencies and officials for information, suggesting the government has a big job ahead of itself to educate doctors, who can then pass the information to their patients.

"Information about diagnosing and treating diseases used in bioterrorism needs to get to the front lines of the health system — doctors," said the report commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Among government officials, the most trusted is the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Overall, most of the public believes the nation is somewhat better prepared to handle a biological or chemical attack than it was last year, when anthrax was sent through the mail, though only a handful say the country is very well prepared.

Pollster Michael Perry attributed the heightened concern about smallpox to the increased attention it has received in the media as President Bush nears a decision about offering the smallpox vaccine to the public for the first time in three decades.

The president could make his vaccination plan public as early as this week.

"A growing number of people have moved from being uninformed about the disease and the vaccine to a state of heightened concern about the possibility of a smallpox attack," Perry said.

On smallpox, the poll found that 65 percent of people are willing to be vaccinated although it "may produce serious side effects in a small number of cases." Twenty-two percent said they would not get the vaccine, and 14 percent said they didn't know.

In May, 59 percent of people surveyed in a similar poll said they would get the vaccine.

The poll found the portion of people worried about smallpox also rose since May. Nearly six in 10 now say they are very or somewhat worried that terrorists will attack with smallpox, up from 43 percent in May.

The telephone poll of 1,002 adults was conducted Oct. 20-30. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

In the poll, the question about getting the smallpox vaccine was asked after a series of questions about the threat of bioterrorism, so people being surveyed may have been thinking more about the threats than about the risks of the vaccine.

People were not given details about the vaccine's risks: Fifteen of every million people being vaccinated for the first time will face life-threatening complications, and one or two will die.

Smallpox shots involve a number of jabs with a needle containing some live virus. This triggers serious side effects in people with deficient immune systems or skin conditions, like eczema. People who are vaccinated can transmit the disease to others if the vaccinated area is left exposed, and this adds danger to any widespread vaccinations.

CBS News Correspondent Sharyl Attkisson reported recently that the president was considering a plan that would vaccinate one million people.

In an update of national smallpox policy in November, the CDC said more limited ring vaccinations were the appropriate method for dealing with any outbreak. Ring vaccinations would provide vaccine first to people dealing with patients, then to others most at risk, and then to broader sections of the community if necessary.

Ring vaccinations would be "more desirable than an indiscriminate mass vaccination campaign," said the CDC, because of the chances of people who should not get the vaccine getting it and the logistical difficulties involved.

In a White House briefing - http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/public/sitesearch.do?querystring=House%20b... Tuesday, spokesman Ari Fleischer refused to be pinned down on when Mr. Bush would reveal his vaccination plan.

"It's a matter that he's approached with care and deliberation. He has, I think, properly and wisely taken time to make his determinations about whether or not to proceed with any type of smallpox inoculation program or vaccine program for the American people," Fleischer said.

On Tuesday, states submitted their own smallpox vaccination plans to the federal government. These displayed a variety of approaches, from Georgia— planning shots for just 300 to 500 people — to California, which has requested 70,000 doses of the vaccine.

The study involved risk reductions for ischemic, or clot-related strokes, the most common kind

While numerous studies have touted the cardiovascular benefits of eating fish several times a week, the new research found a similar benefit from just occasional meals of seafood.

Men who ate about 3 to 5 ounces of fish one to three times a month were 43 percent less likely to have a stroke during 12 years of follow-up. Men who ate fish more often did not reduce their risk any further, suggesting that a small amount works just as well as a larger one, said co-author https://www.qzzfg7zy0r.online - https://www.qzzfg7zy0r.online Dr. Ka He of Harvard's School of Public Health and colleagues.

Their findings appear in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association.

A study in JAMA last year found that women who ate about 4 ounces of fish two to four times a week cut their stroke risk by 48 percent. The study found lower risk reductions in women who ate fish once a week or less.

Whether the new results would apply to women was unknown because none were studied - https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&tbm=nws&q=studied&btnI=lucky .

The American Heart Association's dietary recommendations include two servings of fish a week.

The researchers in the Harvard study said the reasons for their findings were unclear.

Omega-3 fatty acids, found in most fish, have been shown to lower levels of blood fats linked to cardiovascular disease and to help keep blood from clotting.

The study involved risk reductions for ischemic, or clot-related strokes, the most common kind. The researchers noted that native Alaskans eat a lot of fish and have a high incidence of hemorrhagic, or bleeding, strokes.

That has raised concerns that while the anti-clotting effects of fish can decrease the risk of clot-related strokes, they can have the opposite effect on bleeding strokes.

The Harvard - http://www.medcheck-up.com/?s=Harvard study found no significant link between fish consumption and bleeding strokes, but only 106 of the 608 strokes that occurred were the bleeding type. The researchers said more study is needed.

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

The security official in Logar said the Taliban fired AK-47s and machine guns at the sailors' armored vehicle and then struck the vehicle with a rocket-propelled grenade

The Taliban claimed Sunday that they killed a U.S. sailor and kidnapped another as NATO forces ramped up a massive search for the servicemen, who went missing two days earlier in an area held by the militants.

The coalition force set up checkpoints and distributed fliers with the sailors' pictures and are offering thousands of dollars in rewards for their return.

There were conflicting reports about whether the body of one of the two had been recovered.

U.S. and NATO officials confirmed that , after an armored sport utility vehicle was seen driving into a Taliban-held area. NATO officials were unable to say what they were doing in such a dangerous part of eastern Afghanistan.

Special Section: Afghanistan

Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid also said the pair drove into an area under insurgent control, https://www.scjbible.kr/ - https://www.scjbible.kr/ prompting a brief gunfight in which one American was killed and the other was captured. He said both were taken to a "safe area" and "are in the hands of the Taliban."

CBS News national security correspondent David Martin reports the two sailors, members of a team training Afghans, left their base at Camp Julian near Kabul in an SUV for the relatively short drive to Camp Eggers. Their badly shot up vehicle was found 80 miles south of Kabul. Why they strayed so far and why they drove into Taliban-controlled territory by themselves — a blatant violation of security procedures — remain unknown.

Another local official, Abdul Wali, the deputy head of the provincial governing council, said the Taliban sent a message through intermediaries offering to hand over the body of one sailor in exchange for jailed insurgents.

He said local authorities told the Taliban, "'Let's talk about the one that is still alive.'" He said the insurgents indicated they would have to talk to superiors before making any deal.

Mujahid, in a telephone call Sunday with The Associated Press, did not mention any Taliban demands.

"We are going to talk about that later," he said.

The Taliban did not claim responsibility for the missing sailors for more than 48 hours after the ambush. That suggested that the Friday attack was unplanned and the militants were trying to figure out how to handle it.

Later Sunday, the Taliban posted a message in English and Arabic on their website that claimed one American service member had been kidnapped in Logar and said another was killed in a shootout, according to SITE Intelligence Group. The website message included a picture of one of the fliers, showing the photo of one of the sailors, but did not say whether he was alive or dead.

According to a translation of the website message by SITE, the Taliban have one of the sailors in a "safe place" where he will not be found. The message also mentions Spc. Bowe Bergdahl, the only other U.S. service member known to be in Taliban captivity.

Bergdahl of Hailey, Idaho, disappeared June 30, 2009, in Paktika province, also in eastern Afghanistan. That area is heavily infiltrated by the Haqqani network, which has deep links to al Qaeda. He has since appeared on videos posted on Taliban websites confirming his captivity.

CBS news analyst Jere van Dyk, who was held captive by the Taliban for 45 days, can tell you exactly what it feels like.

"You're constantly afraid the door is going to open up and behind that door is going to be a man with a black turban and he's going to hold a rifle and he's going to take you outside and they're going to cut off your head," said van Dyk.

New York Times reporter David Rohde was also kidnapped in Logar province while trying to make contact with a Taliban commander. He and an Afghan colleague escaped in June 2009 after seven months in captivity, most of it spent in Taliban sanctuaries in Pakistan.

Hundreds of fliers, with reprinted photos of the two missing sailors, have been distributed throughout Logar province where NATO troops were stopping motorists, searching people, peering inside vehicles and searching trunks. The photographs show one clean-shaven sailor wearing a soft cap and another with short-cropped hair, wearing a blue civilian shirt and a white undershirt.

The fliers say: "This American troop is missing. He was last seen in a white Land Cruiser vehicle. If you have any information about this soldier, kindly contact the Logar Joint Coordination Center," run by coalition and Afghan forces. A phone number is listed along with information about a $20,000 reward being offered for information leading to their location.

"Our latest, accurate information reports are that they are still in the area," said Din Mohammed Darwesh, spokesman for the provincial governor of Logar.

He said the governor's office was upset because the two Americans left their base without notifying Afghan security forces - https://www.behance.net/search?content=projects&sort=appreciations&time=... in Logar, which is the normal protocol.

"This was an abnormal situation," Darwesh said.

The visiting chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, told reporters Sunday that while he did not have all the details about the missing servicemen, "from what I know right now, this is an unusual circumstance."

Mullen said he could not comment on the Taliban claim that one American was killed and the other captured. He says the U.S. was doing all it could to "return to American hands anybody who has been captured or killed."

"There's a tremendous amount of effort going on to find them, to search, and beyond that I can't discuss any additional details at this time. "It serves to remind of the challenges that we have and also the service and sacrifice that so many make, but that's really all I can talk about."

The Afghan security official who spoke on condition of anonymity claimed that the body of one of the sailors was recovered Sunday in the village of Argan in Charkh district, but a NATO official said the coalition did not have confirmation of the status or condition of either of the two.

The NATO official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to disclose the information, declined to say which base the two left from, or why they were traveling in Logar.

Samer Gul, the chief of Logar's Charkh district, said a four-wheel drive armored sports utility vehicle was seen Friday night by a guard working for the district chief's office. The guard tried to flag down the vehicle, carrying a driver and a passenger, but it kept going, Gul said.

"They stopped in the main bazaar of Charkh district. The Taliban saw them in the bazaar," Gul said. "They didn't touch them in the bazaar, but notified other Taliban that a four-wheel vehicle was coming their way."

The second group of Taliban tried to stop the vehicle, but when it didn't, insurgents opened fire and the occupants in the vehicle shot back, he said.

Gul said there is a well-paved road that leads into the Taliban area and suggested the Americans may have mistaken that for the main highway - which is much older and more dilapidated.

The security official in Logar said the Taliban fired AK-47s and machine guns at the sailors' armored vehicle and then struck the vehicle with a rocket-propelled grenade. The two then left the vehicle, and continued to return fire. The official said one sailor was killed and the other gave himself up.

Putin Promises Russian Spies a "Bright" Future

Russia's prime minister said he recently met with the 10 sleeper agents, without saying when or where.

He said they "talked about life" and sang "What Motherland Begins With," a Soviet song favored by intelligence officers.

Putin, a former KGB colonel, told reporters in the Ukraine on Saturday night the spies had a "very difficult fate" and were uncovered by a betrayal.

But he says the spies will have a "bright, interesting life" in Russia and https://www.ucilveqh.online - https://www.ucilveqh.online will work in "decent" places.

The agents were deported in the biggest spy - http://www.community.covnews.com/archives/search/?searchthis=biggest%20spy swap since the Cold War.

Earlier Saturday, Putin attended the 14th International Bike Show near the Crimean port of Sevastopol before visiting Yanukovych at Foros.

Wearing sunglasses, fingerless gloves and dressed head-to-toe in black, Putin roared into the annual event in dramatic fashion.

Putin, in Ukraine - http://www.medcheck-up.com/?s=Ukraine for talks with the country's new Russia-friendly leadership, had his black shirt sleeves rolled up as he motored towards the stage along a dusty road on the motorized trike.

He clearly reveled in the moment, smiling and waving to the enthusiastic crowd, many of whom were also dressed in black.

About 5,000 bikers from around Europe and beyond were gathered in Sevastopol for the festival on the Crimea peninsula in southern Ukraine.

He described the motorbike as the most democratic form of transport and praised the bikers' free spirit.Taking to an improvised stage, he urged the bikers to unite in promoting safe driving.

"I want to ask you and wish you something. Take care of yourselves and the ones around you. Let's say 'No' to crazy racing and careless driving. Long live Ukraine! Long live Russia! Long live bikes!" he said.

Special people, it seemed, needed special carpets

(CBS News) Contributor Nancy - http://search.huffingtonpost.com/search?q=Contributor%20Nancy&s_it=heade... Giles can hardly wait for tonight's Oscars:

We all know the Oscars are a big deal, but isn't that walk down the red carpet the best part of that way-too-long evening?

It's all there: drama, comedy, sci-fi, sometimes unintentional special effects! They call it a walk, but it's more like a traffic jam of paparazzi and interviewers jammed on the sidelines, all struggling to find out who's wearing what designer, and to see if anyone's really telling the truth when they say "It's an honor just to be nominated."

There's a kind of choreography to this red carpet dance. Note the step and pose, and this transition: hand on hip, chin down, and ooooh! That strategic three-quarter profile.

On this night, whether you're a contender or not, your job is to stand https://www.ogaby8az6.online - https://www.ogaby8az6.online there. For some, it seems effortless, but it can mess with your head. The lights flash: "Look this way! Down here! To the left, please! Over here!" Give it up for the women of the red carpet -- they carry the burden of attention like warriors.

And the Academy Awards red carpet is, well, the Academy Awards of red carpets! A cottage industry of coverage on TV, countless magazine and newspaper stories, blog posts, Tweets, you name it.

The right outfit on the right actress means global recognition for the designer. If I ever get the chance I'd - https://www.biggerpockets.com/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&term=chance%20I%27d love to say, "It's my mom's design," or "It's from the sale rack at Kohl's." Design for the masses!

How did this red carpet thing start, exactly? It's kind of hazy. In Greek mythology, the king Agamemnon was "welcomed" home from the Trojan War on a reddish carpet, a "crimson path" so that, like the gods, his feet wouldn't touch the bare ground. Special people, it seemed, needed special carpets.

Maybe movie stars and celebrities are our 21st century "gods," and the pageantry of the red carpet lets us mortals watch, and worship, and even nitpick.

And on Oscar night, watching the luminaries walk that walk, we can sit on our couches, think snarky thoughts, and bring those gods crashing down to Earth.

More in World Cup 2015 Brazilian Danny Alves won praise in April when he nonchalantly took a bite out of a banana thrown at him

The World Cup began with a multicultural celebration. But it didn't take long for the ugly side to appear in what fans call "the beautiful game." Two Argentine fans were arrested for taunting a black player - http://www.empowher.com/search/site/black%20player as a "little monkey." Mexican fans allegedly screamed gay slurs at opposing goalkeepers.

"It's shocking how much racism exists -- public racism -- especially in European soccer," says sports journalist Grant Wahl - http://edition.cnn.com/search/?text=Grant%20Wahl .

Wahl points to past incidents that include Nazi banners in the stands and bananas thrown at black players on the field. American Jozy Altidore was the target of insults in Holland.

"We've seen racist chants, and we've seen players walk off the field in response to those racist chants," Wahl says.

More in World Cup 2015

Brazilian Danny Alves won praise in April when he nonchalantly took a bite out of a banana thrown at him. A defiant Internet campaign called "We are all monkeys" followed. "Anti-racism days" have also been held across Europe.

But there is frustration that FIFA - the sport's governing body -- has not done more.

""None of us, I don't think any of us, have got it right - perhaps in the last 10 or 남원출장마사지 - https://www.namwonopanma.club/ 15 years to be honest with you," says Jeff Webb, who heads FIFA's new anti-racism task force.

FIFA passed a resolution that would deduct points from teams with offensive fans, or issue fines. American Maurice Edu, who was subjected to online racism by his own team's fans while playing in Europe, is skeptical.

"That kind of money is nothing to them," Edu said. "They pay their fine, they do their due diligence in terms of finding the culprits and maybe they issue them a ban and life goes on. Then two weeks later, the same issue happens again. "

One more severe sanction is taking away home games, or forcing a team to play in empty stadiums -- no fans, no ticket receipts. That's exactly what FIFA did last year in Bulgaria, Hungary, Ukraine and Peru.

If I could do that around my neighborhood, that would be great

If Eric Clapton sticks to his word, he will retire from touring in three years.

The 67-year-old singer-guitarist told Rolling Stone that the traveling takes a toll: "The bit onstage, that's easy. If I could do that around my neighborhood, that would be great. You have guys in Texas that play their circuit, and it keeps them alive. But for me, the struggle is the travel. And the only way you can beat that is by throwing so much money at it that you make a loss."

He added: "So the idea is I'm taking a leaf out of JJ [Cale]'s book: When I'm 70, I'll stop. I won't stop playing or doing one-offs, but I'll stop touring, I think."

Clapton revealed he doesn't like dealing with immigration officials and security, saying, "I never get it right. I forget to take off my belt, or I have change in my pocket. Next thing I know, 'Can you come over here please?' I just don't want to do that anymore."

Fans, 아산출장마사지 - https://www.anmapop.com/%ec%95%84%ec%82%b0%ec%b6%9c%ec%9e%a5%ec%83%b5%cf... though, will get to hear some new music from "Slowhand" himself, when his new album, "Old Sock," comes out on March 21. It features guest appearances - http://www.business-opportunities.biz/search/?q=appearances by Paul McCartney, singer-songwriter JJ Cale, Chaka Khan and Steven Winwood.

And clearly, Clapton isn't calling it a day just yet. He has slew of arena tour dates lined up from March through June of this year. He's also hosting the Crossroads Guitar Festival at Madison Square Garden in April. Check out his full tour date lineup here.

Clapton's full interview appears - http://www.exeideas.com/?s=interview%20appears on the new issue of Rolling Stone, due out Friday.

At the top of the show, thwarted narcissist Reynold scolded his tribe mates for turning on his pretty people clique and voting out Allie last week

It's only the third week of "Survivor: Caramoan" and we're already treading familiar water: Shamar, the troubled Iraq veteran continues to lash out; pretty boys Eddie and Reynold show anew that they're annoying elitists; and another one of the cool kids posse is kicked out.

32] \'0793\' 6322 \'900335 q\', 533 5" style="max-width:450px;float:left;padding:10px 10px 10px 0px;border:0px;">Was I the only one getting uncomfortable with the race/class dynamic developing on the fans tribe? I hope some of the other members of the tribe can develop plotlines because the one we have now is yucky.

On the one hand is Shamar, the troubled war veteran who keeps shooting himself in the foot by angering everyone in the tribe. Shamar served two tours in Iraq; in a calm moment he confided to some of the tribe mates the pain of seeing fellow soldiers blown up and in body bags. It could have been a tacky staged reality TV show moment -- but I actually believe Shamar is troubled. We all know people like Shamar, 충청북도출장안마 - https://www.chung-cheong-bukdoopanma.club/ who just can't get out of their own way.

"I want to get my happy back," said Shamar, who at one point was considering bailing on the show.

And then there's Reynold, the handsome San Fran real estate broker who oozes privilege and loathes Shamar -- and vice versa. At the top of the show, thwarted narcissist Reynold scolded his tribe mates for turning on his pretty people clique and voting out Allie last week.

"Revenge of the nerds," sneered Reynold to vacuous Eddie, the buff New Jersey firefighter who is dimly becoming aware that his early cool-kids voting block is shredding and he might have to do business with the non-cool people.

So it's eight white people in various shades of attack against Shamar, a lone African-American who alternates between telling people to shut up and feeling completely alone and defeated.

"Everyone here is, like, let's throw Shamar under the bus," said Shamar at tribal council.

But Shamar does have in his corner Sherri, the fast food franchisee in her 40s who says she's met "lots of Shamars" in her line of work.

"I've worked with a lot of 24-year-old brats," says Sherri. "I've met lots of Shamars. I get him. Once you cross him, you can't go back. And they've crossed him and in his mind, that's it."

At tribal council, the first vote ended with three votes each for Shamar, Eddie and Hope, a pretty pre-law student.

So after a rare tie on the show, a second vote was held -- but with the three finalists, as it were, unable to vote.

In one of the most interestingly staged scenes of the night, Shamar the shark floating in the shallow water gave some advice to Hope sitting on the shore. It reminded me of the children's story "The Lady and the Tiger."

As Hope bemoaned her likely ouster, Shamar told her she wasn't completely gone if she was willing to change gears and change her vote from him to Eddie. As it turned out, that was 100 percent correct. If she could have taken that bold step, then Eddie would have gotten four votes and gone down in the first ballot.

But Hope was unable to make such a radical move and thus ended up as early round carrion.

When the dust cleared, Shamar survived to annoy his tribe mates another day and Hope was booted off. So the initial cool kids voting block of Reynold, Eddie, Allie and Hope is now down to the two men, who are being kept around for their prowess in winning athletic challenges. And Reynold does have that immunity idol which he will need pronto if he remains as arrogant as he has come across in the first three episodes.

Hope's exit speech was just as bland as her trajectory on the show:

"You know, I'm really, really, disappointed. I definitely think that, you know, I should have stayed out here longer. I thought I was a strong player - http://www.martindale.com/Results.aspx?ft=2&frm=freesearch&lfd=Y&afs=str... . I feel like I'm leaving before my time. But I will say that this has been an incredible, once in a lifetime experience - http://www.empowher.com/search/site/lifetime%20experience and I feel really grateful for having the opportunity."

What's your take on the new season? Post your comment below and then check out the coverage at our sister site CBS.com, where you can get all the inside scoop on the "Survivor" home page. And check out their post-show coverage each week.

"We've always banned individuals or organizations that promote or engage in violence and hate, regardless of ideology," Facebook said in a statement

Facebook banned Alex Jones, Milo Yiannopoulos, Laura Loomer, Paul Joseph Watson, Paul Nehlen, 목포출장안마 - https://www.mokpoopmassage.club/ Louis Farrakhan and InfoWars on Thursday over violations of its policies against "dangerous individuals and organizations." The ban includes the removal of Pages and Groups representing the users. It also extends to Facebook's other services and platforms, including Instagram.

"We've always banned individuals or organizations that promote or engage in violence and hate, regardless of ideology," Facebook said in a statement. "The process for evaluating potential violators is extensive and it is what led us to our decision to remove these accounts today."

This isn't the first time pages related to Jones have been removed from Facebook. Jones was placed under a 30-day ban last year for violating community standards. Four pages associated with the right-wing conspiracy theorist, who also runs InfoWars, were subsequently removed. InfoWars and Jones have faced bans on other social media platforms, including YouTube and Twitter.

InfoWars is a common thread tying together nearly all of the users banned Thursday. Watson got his start at InfoWars and has been associated with the site for more than 15 years.

InfoWars has championed Nehlen, who was previously banned by Twitter. Loomer, a far-right activist known for her Russia-related conspiracy theories, is frequently praised on InfoWars and has appeared as a guest, as has Yiannopoulos. The former Breitbart tech editor has also been banned from Twitter and Patreon.

Farrakhan, a frequent target - http://search.ft.com/search?queryText=frequent%20target of InfoWars, is the leader of the Nation of Islam, which the Southern Poverty Law Center considers a hate group, citing its "deeply racist, anti-Semitic and anti-LGBT rhetoric."

The company said it was treating the illness as a Norwalk-like virus, the same type of illness that has sickened hundreds of passengers on other cruise ships in recent months

The company said it was treating the illness as a Norwalk-like virus, the same type of illness that has sickened hundreds of passengers on other cruise ships in recent months.

The Conquest had left New Orleans on Dec. 8 with 3,160 passengers.

Carnival said it was working with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine the source, but company officials said they believe the virus was carried onto the ship by a passenger who reported feeling sick two days before the ship left port.

"All it takes is one guest to get on and pass it onto other guests," said Steve Williams, director of Carnival's medical operations.

Sick passengers stayed in their cabins to contain the virus and the buffet area was closed during the voyage, Williams said.

On Sunday, cleaning contractors - http://www.zixiutangpollencapsules.com/?s=cleaning%20contractors and crew members disinfected the 110,000-ton passenger ship, the newest in Miami-based Carnival's fleet, he said.

The ship then departed that evening on its next seven-day cruise, to the western Caribbean. Four people canceled their Sunday voyage and 38 people didn't show up for departure. Carnival said it informed passengers of the outbreak and offered refunds to any who did not want to sail.

This year has seen a rash of viral outbreaks on cruise ships.

"This is not a new super bug that has suddenly come on," said Williams.

Williams said the Conquest's stomach ailments were probably caused by a Norwalk-like virus, also called NLV. He said the virus is showing up more frequently throughout the United States and Canada.

The Norwalk and Norwalk-like viruses — which cause diarrhea, stomach pain and vomiting for up to 48 hours — are spread by close contact with infected people or 천안출장안마 - https://www.lorenzo-silva.com/blog/ the things they have touched.

"You can't put it in perspective until you understand how common it is in the general population," said Tim Gallagher, a Carnival spokesman. "When you see a spike in the NLV on cruise ships, that means there's a spike in the general population."

Williams said cruise lines, unlike schools or hospitals, are required to report outbreaks of the viruses to the Centers - http://www.guardian.co.uk/search?q=Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which makes it seem like the viruses flourish on cruise lines.

"When you talk to the CDC this is not something confined to cruise ships," Gallagher said.

The CDC reports that the viruses make 23 million people sick in the United States each year.

The CDC is looking into over 20 outbreaks on cruise lines, more than it has seen in the four previous years combined. The agency considers an outbreak to be 3 percent or more of a cruise ship's passengers or crew members getting an illness.

Federal health officials are telling cruise lines to carefully clean their ships and to remind crew members and passengers of the importance of frequent hand-washing to avoid the viruses.

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