The plan is meant as an alternative to compulsory licensing, under which countries facing health crises seize patent rights and make drugs without the cooperation of the original maker

Pharmacia Corp. said it will work with the International Dispensary Association in Amsterdam to provide licenses and technological skills to generic companies to make its drug delavirdine, an anti-retroviral sold under the trade name Rescriptor.

AIDS activists praised the idea of using a nonprofit agency as an intermediary — even if the drug on offer is not in great demand. But they stressed that without billions more in aid from the West, the world's poorest countries wouldn't be able to afford even the cheap, generic copies.

"This is half of what's needed," said Dr. Amir Attaran of the Center for International Development at Harvard University, who helped develop the model. "This helps solve the supply side, but there's no demand because these countries are deadly poor."

The plan was announced at the World Economic Forum by Pharmacia — which is being acquired by Pfizer Inc. — and groups involved in trying to bridge the often bitter divide between drug companies and activists.

The IDA — a 30-year-old organization that works to get generic drugs into developing countries — would monitor production quality and collect a 5 percent royalty to cover costs and fund new research.

The generic companies - http://www.travelwitheaseblog.com/?s=generic%20companies could then sell the copies in 78 countries where annual per-capita income is less than $1,200 or the HIV infection rate is above 1 percent.

The plan is meant as an alternative to compulsory licensing, under which countries facing health crises seize patent rights and make drugs without the cooperation of the original maker.

"We think its a very innovative step in the right direction," said Richard Feachem, executive director of the Geneva-based Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Drugs would be sold at a "reasonable price and with assured quality," Feachem said.

Most importantly for 안양출장안마 - https://www.softanma.com/11-anyang Pharmacia and other drug companies that were being encouraged to consider following suit, the copies would be different in shape, color, packaging and name from the same medicine sold in the West. This would help customs officials prevent smugglers bringing the cheap version back into developed countries.

"If low-cost products undermine the high-cost market, then the profit goes, then the research and development goes," Feachem said.

Daniel Berman, a spokesman for the Access to Essential Medicines campaign at Doctors Without Borders, called the model "really quite interesting."

"For the first time a company is offering a nonprofit organization rights to distribute its AIDS drug in a large block of developing countries," he said.

But he said delavirdine — which usually has to be taken in combination with other drugs — would not be of much benefit to people with AIDS because it's not on the World Health Organization's essential medicines list and is not much in demand.

He called on other drugs companies to follow suit — and for a mandatory system if they refuse.

"If we leave it up to the companies to decide, in most cases what the developing countries will get will be the crumbs," he said.

Pharmacia's senior vice president Michael Friedman said the company was trying to provide more "options" for poor countries.

He described the plan for delavirdine as "a model system that has to be explored," and stressed that Pfizer — the world's largest drug company — was "strongly supportive."

Feachem conceded that many countries couldn't afford even those drugs without international aid. After the Global Fund - http://lerablog.org/?s=Global%20Fund distributes its second round of grants next week — $500 million to programs in 60 countries — it will be basically broke.

"We're fully unfunded for the third round," Feachem said, calling on Group of Seven countries who created the fund to keep it alive. The fund has raised $2.2 billion but needs $6 billion more in the next few years, Feachem said.

By Paul Geitner

On our first date, in New York City, we closed the restaurant down at 2 a.m.! He didn't kiss me, and I was madly in love

Olivia Wilde says she's thankful for the heartbreak - http://www.newsweek.com/search/site/heartbreak of her divorce from Tao Rispoli -- because it led to her finding love with "Saturday Night Live" star Jason Sudeikis.

In a new interview with Marie Claire magazine, Wilde revealed: "I had grown up with Tao; we had just drifted. I felt I had something to prove. If you fall off a horse, you get back up. I am not a quitter. I hung on for as long as possible, until it was more hurtful to stay...I'm so grateful for the pain and the heartbreak. It gave me the courage to leave and brought me to the great love of my life."

Wilde, 29, also shared how she felt when she met her fiance for the first time, at the "SNL" finale in 2011.

"I was just learning to be by myself," she told the magazine. "We were both seeing people but were single. He seemed to really see me, see through the bullshit. He said very few words and couldn't keep eye contact. He was so handsome, and he could dance."

When Wilde and https://www.umammuowc.online - https://www.umammuowc.online Sudeikis, 37, went out for the first time six months later, she recalled, "I thought, 'He won't be interested in me; I'm not a contender.' He was so cool, so funny -- I was such a fan of his and had always fancied his speed and his intelligence. He's a brilliant actor with a brain like lightening...I felt like fresh meat at the market...I thought, 'I'm not beautiful enough or his type.' I couldn't wait to sit down and hear him talk. On our first date, in New York City, we closed the restaurant down at 2 a.m.! He didn't kiss me, and I was madly in love. I was overwhelmed."

Now, "The Incredible Burt Wonderstone" actress is looking ahead, and says she "can't wait" to have children with Sudeikis.

"We've discussed all our ideals and hopes. I can't wait for children. I'm open-minded about how many, but three, which I love, is like a little party. I am not trying to have kids now - there's no strict plan for anything in my life. What happens, happens," she said. "He's so good with kids...I've never before experienced looking at someone and thinking, That's who I want to raise a child with."

The April issue of Marie Claire arrives on newsstands March 19. See another photo from the magazine - http://www.superghostblogger.com/?s=magazine below:

"People would go to one conference and hear one thing and someone else would go to another conference and hear something else," said Shelley Witter, manager of information systems at Galveston

Aesthetics was not the point.

The wall was knocked down two months ago to ease patient traffic that often clustered around the reception desk because someone lingering around might see a medical file. Such an accidental glance now could be construed as a federal offense.

Federal regulations that went into effect April 14 mandate that health providers, insurance companies and pharmacies limit disclosures of patients' medical information. Providers have spent millions of dollars and countless hours readying for the privacy portion of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, known as HIPAA.

Compliance has meant changes big and small, from building or tearing down walls, to door locks on rooms with patient files, to removing bulletin boards with patient notes to upgrading software and computer systems.

Enforcement is another matter. The Department of Health and Human Services has hired only 40 people to monitor compliance, so surprise or regular inspections aren't part the review plan. Instead, HHS is counting on individuals to report infractions. It estimates that 21,000 complaints will be filed in the first year; in the first 2 1/2 weeks, 70 were registered.

HHS spokesman Bill Pierce said half the complaints probably won't be privacy-related, and facts and circumstances would determine how the agency proceeds.

For example, he said, leaving a medical file out on a desk once wouldn't necessarily be a violation, but doing it repeatedly most likely would be.

Mazlin and Shaw, Manhattan obstetricians and gynecologists, thought removing the wall was necessary.

"There could be medical charts on the desk, on the computer screen," said Barbara Velez, who manages the practice. "We had to find a way to reduce that traffic."

The regulations mandate that doctors, hospitals and insurers notify patients of the privacy regulations, describing how their medical information may be used and their rights under the new rules. Directions on how to report violations must also be included, and patients must be told they have a right to review their records, request errors be changed and limit who has access to it.

Many health care providers have been giving patients forms detailing their rights, and asking patients to sign releases.

News organizations can also be affected by the regulations, and are concerned about restrictions on information important to the public. If, for example, victims of disasters, accidents or crimes are taken to a hospital, officials might not release any information without patients' consent, making it nearly impossible to learn the names and conditions of the injured.

Those regulated by the rule are leaving nothing to chance.

"The preparation was massive - massive and all-consuming," said Kathryn Bakich, vice president-national director for health care compliance at The Segal Co., a benefits consulting firm.

"People are getting hysterical. There is a lot of wiggle room in the regulations, so people have to decide what is a reasonable effort at compliance and what is not."

Penalties for privacy violations range from a $100 fine to up to a $250,000 fine and 10 years in prison. The most severe punishment is reserved for people who intended to sell medical information for personal or financial gain or to harm the patient.

So far, https://www.titaniumdioxide.top/ - https://www.titaniumdioxide.top/ patients have had little reaction. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston provided patients with a phone number to call if they had HIPAA questions, but many of the calls have been to check on doctor's appointments.

When Robin Ruffner went into a Manhattan hospital last week for plastic surgery, she was irritated at having to sign a form when she was jittery about the procedure.

"I was really nervous and didn't feel like reading a form. I think it would have been better if they gave me them a week before when I wasn't nervous," the 31-year old social worker said.

Ruffner also signed a HIPAA release form at a visit to the allergist earlier this month. But overall, Ruffner said, she doesn't mind signing the forms because she thinks laws to protect patients' medical records are a good idea.

The medical community has spent vast amounts to show patients and the government it is serious protecting medical records. The University of Texas at Galveston has spent about $1.5 million, not counting all the personnel time, on compliance. The U.S. Department - http://www.bing.com/search?q=Department&form=MSNNWS&mkt=en-us&pq=Department of Health and Human Services estimates compliance will cost the industry $17.6 billion over 10 years.

Some observers worry that these costs will trickle down to consumers, but HHS spokesman Pierce said efficiencies from electronic transfer of records will save nearly $30 billion over the same time. One of HIPAA's mandates is to standardize the electronic transfer of patient records, but this part of the regulations does not go into full effect until Oct. 16.

Bakich said health insurers are telling clients administrative costs will rise because of updating systems to comply with the regulations, which in turn could increase premiums.

"This comes at a bad time because health care costs were going up anyway," Bakich said.

Despite the legions of businesses offering HIPAA advice, health executives say one of the challenging aspects of compliance is deciphering the rules and figuring out what is necessary to comply.

"People would go to one conference and hear one thing and someone else would go to another conference and hear something else," said Shelley Witter, manager of information systems at Galveston.

Galveston had to update its computer system so it could make a list of patients who had to be informed of the regulations and track them as they were. It also had to record who might have received information without the patient's consent, which is allowed in certain circumstances such as reporting suspected child abuse.

Another delicate issue has been implementing the regulations without negatively affecting communication between hospitals and doctors and their patients and patients' families and loved ones.

Pierce said hospitals and doctors use their judgment about which family members and friends should receive a patient's medical information. But now many doctors and hospitals are asking patients to put it in writing.

Some units at MCG hospital in Augusta, Ga., have patients create a password given to those authorized to speak with the medical staff.

"This way people can get updates," Regina Maier, of the MCG Health System. "The communication issue becomes harder when so many people live far from family and friends."

Meanwhile, journalists are still grappling with the laws. In small towns, printing the names of people who went into the hospital or nursing home was common and advocates say such practices unified a community.

"This regulation imposes big city values on us (small papers)," said Tonda Rush, counsel to the National Newspaper Association, a trade group for small papers.

Rush also fears the new regulations will silence potential whistle blowers from speaking to journalists because their actions could be considered HIPAA violations.

"The confusions and doubts about the law could keep people quiet," Rush said.

By Theresa Agovino

Separately officials in Kuala Lumpur announced that Malaysia will impose a 10-day quarantine on students and workers arriving from SARS-affected areas

Highlighting the disease's global nature, Canadian officials angrily rejected suggestions that a Finnish man contracted SARS in Toronto, a city which insists its outbreak is under control.

The world death toll from severe acute respiratory syndrome reached at least 559, with the deaths in Taiwan, as well as 12 more in Beijing and three in Hong Kong. There were at least 7,400 known SARS cases.

As new infection rates drop in Beijing, Hong Kong and elsewhere, the disease spread in Taiwan.

New deaths there pushed the island's tally to 27 fatalities and 207 cases of infection. It also reported 23 new cases on Monday — its worst one-day jump since the outbreak began two months ago.

Despite the statistics, the vice chairman of Taiwan's SARS Control and Relief Committee, Dr. Lee Ming-liang, said some of the cases had taken more than a week to confirm and there were indications the outbreak could still be brought under control.

Authorities also announced the death by suicide of a man with SARS at a Taipei hospital last month. They said he had received erroneous information that his wife had died of the disease.

A dentist in southern Kaohsiung also was one of the new deaths reported Monday, an indication that SARS has spread from northern and central Taiwan to the south.

The man, with a history of tuberculosis, died a week ago, but officials only determined that he died of SARS recently, judging from the rapid deterioration of his health, officials said.

Officials said he might have contracted the illness from one of his patients.

In Taipei, morning commuters started the working week by complying with a government order to wear masks on the city's subway. Also Taiwanese authorities are installing video cameras to keep watch over about 8,000 people quarantined in their homes in case they have contracted the illness.

Meanwhile, https://www.uzplxb5ac.online - https://www.uzplxb5ac.online the WHO visited southern Guangxi province, fearing it could be hit by an epidemic which could possibly be brought in by hundreds of thousands of returning migrant workers.

Although infection rates in some urban areas, like Beijing are falling, there's a real danger that SARS could spread fast through the countryside. Premier Wen Jiabao has warned of possible unseen "channels of infection" in rural areas without adequate hospitals and doctors.

"Guangxi is susceptible to infection because of its location," WHO spokeswoman Mangai Balasegaram said. "It's a poor region. It would be ... less able to cope."

On Sunday, China's basketball star Yao Ming, who plays for the NBA's Houston Rockets, hosted a telethon for SARS research from his hometown of Shanghai, bringing in more than $300,000.

In Finland, the University of Turku Central Hospital said a Finnish man who had been on vacation in SARS-hit Toronto in late April had probably contracted the illness.

It said the patient was recovering well, and that no one who had been in contact with him had shown any of the disease's symptoms: fever, aches, dry cough and shortness of breath.

Officials in Canada, eager to avoid disruptions - http://browse.deviantart.com/?q=disruptions to its tourism, disputed that there was a Toronto link to the case.

Dr. Colin D'Cunha, health commissioner in Ontario province, said the idea was "preposterous," and that the only way the man could have been infected in Toronto was through SARS patients in a hospital.

"Unless somebody managed to visit one of our hospitals despite the restrictions ... they couldn't have been exposed — it's that blunt," he said. "I'm sure the (Finnish patient) had some respiratory symptoms and, simply put, was diagnosed with SARS because the person had spent some time in Toronto."

In Malaysia, where two people have died of the illness, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder continued with a Southeast Asia tour Monday. Aides to the chancellor said he is not taking any extraordinary precautions regarding his health during his tour.

Separately officials in Kuala Lumpur announced that Malaysia will impose a 10-day quarantine on students and workers arriving from SARS-affected areas.

"This matter is so urgent, which is why we have decided to implement it straightaway," Health Minister Chua Jui Meng said.

In Hong Kong, about 250,000 primary students headed back to class Monday after a six-week school closure. High school students resumed studies recently.

South Korea on Monday reported its second case of SARS after an American man in his 80s showed symptoms of the disease after arriving the previous day from the Philippines.

The ethnic Filipino man was placed under quarantine, and officials tried to track other passengers aboard the Asiana Airlines flight OZ372.

It is a great start." Josh said that after his parents experienced a miscarriage in 2011, he hoped for a happy outcome for this pregnancy

The Duggar family just keeps getting bigger, with another baby on the way for the famous reality TV clan's oldest child.

Josh and Anna Duggar shared the "exciting" news with People magazine that they are expecting their third child. Josh, 25, is part of the Duggar family featured on TLC's "19 Kids and Counting."

Anna, 24, had taken a pregnancy test while the family was visiting Asia during filming of the show and the test came back negative - http://www.caringbridge.org/search?q=negative . "I thought for sure I was pregnant and so I was a little disappointed" Anna told People. "But two weeks later, I found out I was pregnant."

PICS: Star sightings

Josh's father, Jim Bob, said he was thrilled with the news. "It is neat to see their family expanding. I remember those days when Michelle and I went from one to three because we had Josh and then we had twins. It is a great start."

Josh said that after his parents experienced a miscarriage in 2011, he hoped for a happy outcome for this pregnancy. "With my mom's last pregnancy there are questions and the fear of every expectant parent that this could end. There is always some sort of risk with pregnancy and you never really know," he said.

RELATED: https://www.mfvpyou5.online - https://www.mfvpyou5.online Michelle Duggar undergoes mom makeover

"Guangxi is susceptible to infection because of its location," WHO spokeswoman Mangai Balasegaram said

Highlighting the disease's global nature, Canadian officials angrily rejected suggestions that a Finnish man contracted SARS in Toronto, a city which insists its outbreak is under control.

The world death toll from severe acute respiratory syndrome reached at least 559, with the deaths in Taiwan, as well as 12 more in Beijing and three in Hong Kong. There were at least 7,400 known SARS cases.

As new infection rates drop in Beijing, https://www.muraem1tz.online/ - https://www.muraem1tz.online/ Hong Kong - http://bordersalertandready.com/?s=Hong%20Kong&search=Search and elsewhere, the disease spread in Taiwan.

New deaths there pushed the island's tally to 27 fatalities and 207 cases of infection. It also reported 23 new cases on Monday — its worst one-day jump since the outbreak began two months ago.

Despite the statistics, the vice chairman of Taiwan's SARS Control and Relief Committee, Dr. Lee Ming-liang, said some of the cases had taken more than a week to confirm and there were indications the outbreak could still be brought under control.

Authorities also announced the death by suicide of a man with SARS at a Taipei hospital last month. They said he had received erroneous information that his wife had died of the disease.

A dentist in southern Kaohsiung also was one of the new deaths reported Monday, an indication that SARS has spread from northern and central Taiwan to the south.

The man, with a history of tuberculosis, died a week ago, but officials only determined that he died of SARS recently, judging from the rapid deterioration of his health, officials said.

Officials said he might have contracted the illness from one of his patients.

In Taipei, morning commuters started the working week by complying with a government order to wear masks on the city's subway. Also Taiwanese authorities are installing video cameras to keep watch over about 8,000 people quarantined in their homes in case they have contracted the illness.

Meanwhile, the WHO visited southern Guangxi province, fearing it could be hit by an epidemic which could possibly be brought in by hundreds of thousands of returning migrant workers.

Although infection rates in some urban areas, like Beijing are falling, there's a real danger that SARS could spread fast through the countryside. Premier Wen Jiabao has warned of possible unseen "channels of infection" in rural areas without adequate hospitals and doctors.

"Guangxi is susceptible to infection because of its location," WHO spokeswoman Mangai Balasegaram said. "It's a poor region. It would be ... less able to cope."

On Sunday, China's basketball star Yao Ming, who plays for the NBA's Houston Rockets, hosted a telethon for SARS research from his hometown of Shanghai, bringing in more than $300,000.

In Finland, the University of Turku Central Hospital said a Finnish man who had been on vacation in SARS-hit Toronto in late April had probably contracted the illness.

It said the patient was recovering well, and that no one who had been in contact with him had shown any of the disease's symptoms: fever, aches, dry cough and shortness of breath.

Officials in Canada, eager to avoid disruptions to its tourism, disputed that there was a Toronto link to the case.

Dr. Colin D'Cunha, health commissioner in Ontario province, said the idea was "preposterous," and that the only way the man could have been infected in Toronto was through SARS patients in a hospital.

"Unless somebody managed to visit one of our hospitals despite the restrictions ... they couldn't have been exposed — it's that blunt," he said. "I'm sure the (Finnish patient) had some respiratory symptoms and, simply put, was diagnosed with SARS because the person had spent some time in Toronto."

In Malaysia, where two people have died of the illness, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder continued with a Southeast Asia tour Monday. Aides to the chancellor said he is not taking any extraordinary precautions regarding his health during his tour.

Separately officials in Kuala Lumpur announced that Malaysia will impose a 10-day quarantine on students and workers arriving from SARS-affected areas.

"This matter is so urgent, which is why we have decided to implement it straightaway," Health Minister Chua Jui Meng said.

In Hong Kong, about 250,000 primary students headed back to class Monday after a six-week school closure. High school students resumed studies recently.

South Korea on Monday reported its second case of SARS after an American man in his 80s showed symptoms of the disease after arriving the previous day from the Philippines.

The ethnic Filipino man was placed under quarantine, and officials tried to track other passengers aboard the Asiana Airlines flight OZ372.

But authorities in China still fear it might spread into the countryside, where the majority of China's 1.3 billion people live amid a shortage of doctors and hospitals unable to cope with epidemics

It's not clear why there may be a difference in susceptibility between the genders, at least in the Southeast Asian city-state, which has imposed tough isolation and other measures to curb the illness.

On Friday, a Singapore court for the first time invoked tough new anti-SARS laws and imprisoned a man for six months for repeatedly flouting a home quarantine order. The man, who has since been cleared of any infection, was arrested when he went out drinking.

A government newspaper in Hong Kong claimed SARS originated in the U.S., not China, reports CBS News' Jeff Gibson. The article cited a Philadelphia woman who died of a strange flu-like virus early last year. But health experts like those from the World Health Organization still believe that the virus was spawned in China's southern Guangdong province, traditionally a petrie dish for the world's flu outbreaks.

A shortage of face masks in southern China has caused factories to stop production of women's bras and switch to making face masks. However, some residents are waiting for the changeover: They're using bras as face masks now.

Meanwhile, work by Singapore's Genome Institute, and published in Britain's The Lancet medical journal on Friday, indicates that the SARS virus is surprisingly stable and not rapidly mutating. This could challenge theories that it jumped from farm animals to humans not long before its first outbreak was reported in southern China in November.

It could also mean the virus is older than previously thought, said Earl Brown, a virologist at the University of Ottawa in Canada, who was not involved with the study. "Generally you'd see a virus mutate more when it first comes into a new situation," Brown said.

As the mystery over SARS origins and behavior deepened, the global toll climbed to at least 515 dead and more than 7,000 infected in over 25 countries on Friday.

Taiwan reported 18 new cases on infection, its largest one-day jump since the outbreak began there two months ago. Authorities feared it may have spread from capital Taipei to the island's south.

Hong Kong reported only two deaths and six new cases — the lowest daily infection increase so far.

"The trend continues to be very encouraging," said the territory's top political leader, Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa, who has imposed strict quarantine rules and https://www.ldklwe2qh.online - https://www.ldklwe2qh.online other tough measures. "We cannot let down our guard," he said.

China announced six more fatalities and 118 new hospitalizations.

Beijing accounted for two of the latest Chinese deaths as well as 48 new cases of infection. Earlier a senior official said new SARS hospital admissions had fallen from a peak of 70 to 80 per day last month to an average of 30 to 40 per day over the past week.

Malaysia reported its first new probable SARS case in two weeks on Friday, a day after health authorities declared that the worst of its outbreak was over. The patient is a 31-year-old hotel restaurant chef who recently worked in neighboring Singapore, officials said.

In Singapore, a study that analyzes its nine-week-long SARS outbreak, shows that while women in the city-state outnumbered men in contracting the illness, more than half of those who died were men.

The research, by the World Health Organization and Singapore's Health Ministry, said 66 percent of the island's probable SARS cases were women, but that 56 percent of the deaths were men. It did not explain the higher male death rate.

Those findings followed WHO's announcement on Thursday that the disease is far more deadly than it previously thought. The Geneva-based U.N. agency doubled its estimate for the global death rate to between 14 percent and 15 percent, with more than half of patients over 65 years old likely to die.

The Singapore study released Friday found on overall death rate of 12.5 percent.

In Manila, the Asian Development Bank counted the economic costs of SARS and cut its growth forecasts for Asia again. Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan would be the hardest hit, with growth in 2003 declining by 1.8 percentage points, 1.1 points and 0.9 points respectively, if the impact of SARS extends until the end of June, the bank said. That would lower annual - http://www.automotivedigitalmarketing.com/main/search/search?q=lower%20a... growth rates to 0.8 percent, 1.9 percent and 2.8 percent for the three economies.

In an apparent sign of confidence in the battle against the disease in Beijing, authorities announced that college entrance tests for more than 80,000 are to take place June 7-8 as scheduled.

Officials may have feared that canceling the tests would provoke too much frustration in the city, following tough anti-SARS measures that have closed cinemas, gyms and other public facilities, and suspended classes at most universities.

"The upward tendency of SARS cases has been effectively checked in Beijing, and the epidemic shows signs of declining," Liang Wannian, deputy director-general of the city Health Bureau said at a news conference.

So far, SARS has mostly been an urban disease. But authorities in China still fear it might spread into the countryside, where the majority of China's 1.3 billion people live amid a shortage of doctors and hospitals unable to cope with epidemics.

In Hong Kong, where at least 210 have died of the disease, health officials were investigating an alleged coverup of a SARS outbreak at a private hospital, which failed to reported suspected SARS cases as required.

It is a real relationship and I'm going to have many of them." Hartsock said she's happy for Lowe and Guidici, adding, "I could only hope to have the love that they've found and I am very hopeful in all of this

It just goes to show you that if you don't find love the first time, try try again.

Desiree Hartsock - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/search/?queryText=Desiree%20Hartsock failed to win the heart of "Bachelor" Sean Lowe this past season, but she'll take another stab at love when she stars as the new "Bachelorette."

The news was announced on Monday night after Lowe gave out his last rose and proposed to Catherine Giudici during the season finale of ABC's "The Bachelor."

"I just can't even believe I'm here. With the support of everyone, it's just such a blessing," Hartsock said. "I could never have imagined signing up for 'The Bachelor' and having this opportunity."

The 26-year-old bridal stylist - http://imageshack.us/photos/stylist was among the 26 women hoping to make it with Lowe. Soon she'll have a batch of suitors of her own.

"I'm ready, I'm open and I've seen it happen," she said. "I did realize that the feelings are real - the emotions that you go through. It is a real relationship and I'm going to have many of them."

Hartsock said she's happy for https://www.gkylhn740.online - https://www.gkylhn740.online Lowe and Guidici, adding, "I could only hope to have the love that they've found and I am very hopeful in all of this. And I do hope to meet the man of my dreams."

"The Bachelorette" will kick off May 20 on ABC with a two-hour premiere on ABC.

1 ranking in the magazine's top 10 cities list appears in the August edition of Travel + Leisure, which was based on a poll of readers who cast votes from December to March to rate their favorite cities, islands, hotels, airlines and other categories

Bangkok Gov. Sukhumbhand Paribatra told a news conference that the award offers a morale boost to the battered capital and called on political protesters to behave themselves. The recent political upheaval prompted dozens of international travel advisories and emptied hotels.

"What we have in our hands is very precious," said Sukhumbhand. "We must prevent troubles and any more losses from happening in our beloved city. We should not damage it any further."

A grenade explosion Sunday in a central Bangkok shopping area killed one person and wounded 10. Authorities have declined to speculate if it was politically related.

The No. 1 ranking in the magazine's top 10 cities list appears in the August edition of Travel + Leisure, which was based on a poll of readers who cast votes from December to March to rate their favorite cities, islands, hotels, https://www.sronsuy2d6.online - https://www.sronsuy2d6.online airlines and other categories. Nearly 16,000 readers participated. The polling stopped a few days before civil disorder erupted in Bangkok that lasted 10 weeks and ended May 19 with nearly 90 dead and 1,400 hurt.

During the chaos, several top hotels and upscale department stores closed because they were surrounded by thousands - http://www.ajaxtime.com/?s=thousands of anti-government protesters - http://www.covnews.com/archives/search/?searchthis=anti-government%20pro... . Dozens of buildings were damaged or burned as the protests were broken up in a military crackdown.

Nationwide hotel occupancy in May - the end of tourism's high season - was 32 percent, down 10 percent from the same period last year, said Prakit Chinamornpong, president of Thai Hotels Association.

The Bangkok governor visited New York last week to pick up the award from the magazine's publishers and said he met with Mayor Michael Bloomberg and asked for advice about New York's post 9-11 recovery.

"'Bad things happened, but we must move forward. We can't stop. We must keep up the morale.' That's what Mayor Bloomberg told me," he said.

New York City ranked 10th among favorite cities in the poll. Second was the northern Thai city of Chiang Mai, followed by Florence, Italy; San Miguel de Allende, Mexico; and Rome.

Bangkok also was the top city in 2008.

Also in the territory, Dr

In a new restriction, all passengers on Taipei's subway system now must wear medical masks. When the measure came into force on Sunday, the usual din of conversation on trains was absent as masked people sat quietly. Many wore baseball hats, apparently hoping to get extra protection against the virus. At train depots, cleaners scrubbed hand rails of cars with bleach-dipped cloths.

The worldwide death toll from severe acute respiratory syndrome was at least 536 on Sunday with 11 new deaths — six in China, three in Hong Kong, and one each in Taiwan and Singapore. More than 7,300 people have been infected in over 25 countries.

Also, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder went ahead with a Southeast Asian tour while a top U.S. university slightly eased a ban on students from SARS-hit countries.

As Japan sent two infectious disease experts to China to help, optimistic Beijing officials maintained the capital's SARS outbreak is waning. However, the city's Communist Party secretary talked tough after the World Health Organization complained about holes in patient data.

"We can't allow the slightest relaxation in the fight against SARS in May," the party's People's Daily newspaper quoted Liu Qi as saying.

He ordered officials to "make utmost efforts to fight Beijing's May battle against SARS and obtain total victory in the work of SARS prevention."

China remains the hardest hit country with at least 240 SARS deaths. Another 69 cases on Sunday raised its infection tally to 4,948. Thousands more are being kept in quarantine amid fears that the disease is spreading from cities and into the impoverished countryside, where medical facilities would not be able to cope with a sweeping epidemic.

New infection rates have dropped dramatically - http://www.paramuspost.com/search.php?query=dropped%20dramatically&type=... in Beijing in recent days. Only 42 new cases were reported Sunday along with four deaths in the city.

But WHO says it is too early to declare that the capital's outbreak has peaked. It says Beijing health authorities can't explain how about half of its more than 2,200 SARS patients caught the virus — an omission in data that hinders attempts to fight its spread.

Taiwan announced the death of a hospital nurse that raised its toll to 19. It also reported 12 new cases on Sunday, and officials fear the illness is spreading from Taipei and through the south of the island.

In response, Taiwan is installing video cameras to keep watch over about 8,000 people quarantined in their homes in case they have contracted the illness.

Video surveillance was ordered after three-times-a-day phone call checks by health officials were being circumvented by people who broke the quarantine by leaving home and forwarding all calls to their mobile phones.

SARS has killed 18 people and infected 184 in Taiwan, where the transmission pattern is described as high by WHO's Web site.

In Hong Kong, 215 people have died and 1,678 infected. Only four new cases were reported Sunday confirming a falling infection rate that, along with warmer weather, has persuaded many people to stop wearing masks.

Business people and tourism officials, worried about Hong Kong's image, have welcomed their growing abandonment.

"You can't see our smile when we put the masks on," said James Lu, executive director of the Hong Kong Hotels Association.

Also in the territory, Dr. David Ho, a researcher who helped pioneer a drug cocktail treatment for AIDS patients, said there had been promising results from laboratory tests on the SARS virus using an anti-HIV treatment, synthetic peptides — amino acids that slow AIDS in an expensive drug called Fuzeon.

Tests using animals could take place soon. But it was too early to use such medications to treat human SARS patients.

"We're not saying this is the drug to treat (SARS) patients tomorrow or next month," said Ho, who is scientific director of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center in New York.

Hong Kong health officials have taken samples from a public housing complex where five cases had been found, Director of Health Margaret Chan said. A local newspaper said some residents of the building had fled fearing they would be subjected to strict quarantine.

Meanwhile, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder Sunday arrived in Malaysia, which has reported two SARS deaths. His five-day tour also takes him to Singapore, where SARS has claimed 27 lives, Indonesia and Vietnam, which appears to have beaten an outbreak that killed five.

Schroeder had planned originally to take a delegation of 120. However, this was cut to 30 because of the SARS threat.

In Geneva, the international basketball federation, FIBA, said it might move the July 10-20 junior men's World Championships from Malaysia to the Greek capital, Athens, https://www.mdfbjfn875.online - https://www.mdfbjfn875.online because of SARS.

In the United States, the University of California at Berkeley eased a ban on students from SARS-affected areas of Asia who have enrolled in summer school, saying it will welcome about 80 students from Taiwan, China and Hong Kong who have enrolled in core academic classes.

But it will maintain a ban on nearly 600 English language students. About US$1 million in fees will be refunded.

A civil rights group, Chinese for Affirmative Action, says the ban is discriminatory and too broad.

For people like 15-year-old Charlotte Jones, browsing through the stacks of about 14,000 movies in person rivals any experience offered online

An announcement last Thursday confirmed the Blockbuster in Bend, Oregon, will be the last one open in the country. And people from all over are traveling to Bend for a piece of Americana.

"We came here from all the way across the country," one customer said.

For people like 15-year-old Charlotte Jones, browsing through the stacks of about 14,000 movies in person rivals any experience offered online.

"Just being here is kind of cool because it's the last one," Jones said. "When you see them all, like, next to each other, it kind of makes it easier. But with like on Netflix, you only see the title and that's all. But you have to like scroll through it and it takes a while to get through all of the movies."

General Manager Sandi Harding says customers visiting the Blockbuster in Oregon treasure its customer service and familiarity.

"It's all alphabetical so it still comes all the way around in the alphabet to find them," Harding said. "Nothing really has changed. We still have the category signs. I think if a customer walked in here, they would still be like oh, I can find that movie because it's like the library. You go and you kinda know where things are."

The store's owners don't plan to close anytime soon. In fact, https://www.hycup.online - https://www.hycup.online they say as long as they can pay their employees and turn any kind of profit, they'll keep these doors open as long as possible. If that doesn't work, they joke they could turn the store into a museum.

Blockbuster was once the largest video rental chain in the U.S., with close to 9,000 stores worldwide. At one point, it's estimated a new store opened every 17 hours.

The chain was ubiquitous in strip malls and on street corners, but with the arrival of Netflix in the late 1990's, Blockbuster stores began disappearing just as quickly as they arrived. Following bankruptcy in 2010, Blockbuster closed nearly all of its stores.

Last week, there were only three in the U.S. including two in Alaska where expensive internet and long winters helped keep the stores in business - https://www.behance.net/search?content=projects&sort=appreciations&time=... . On Thursday, the Alaska stores announced they would close for good.

"We are having difficulty with financing, so we had to prioritize," said UNICEF Japan program coordinator Yasushi Katsuma

Over the next two years, an estimated 297 million oral polio vaccines and $35 million no longer needed for polio-free regions - http://browse.deviantart.com/?qh=&section=&global=1&q=polio-free%20regions will be redirected to the 13 countries, the World Health Organization, U.N. Children's Fund, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Rotary International said in a joint statement.

The shift in resources was partly caused by the scarcity of funds.

"We are having difficulty with financing, so we had to prioritize," said UNICEF Japan program coordinator Yasushi Katsuma.

Officials predict the eradication program will cost $275 million from the end of 2002 through 2005, and said they expect a $33 million shortfall this year alone.

Once an epidemic, the disease has disappeared from much of the planet.

Last year, polio affected 1,919 people and was endemic in only seven countries: Afghanistan, Egypt, India, Nigeria, Niger, Pakistan and Somalia.

Six other countries - Angola, Bangladesh, https://www.yhosl0x4z.online - https://www.yhosl0x4z.online the Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Nepal and Sudan - have no reported cases but remain at high risk of infection because of their proximity to polio-ravaged areas and lower rates of vaccinations, UNICEF's Katsuma said.

Among the infected countries, India, Pakistan and Nigeria account for 99 percent of all cases, the WHO said.

The last major disease to be successfully eradicated under a WHO-sponsored vaccination program was smallpox, which saw its last case in 1978.

To be declared disease-free, a country must have no new cases for three years.

Polio attacks the central nervous system, causing paralysis and, occasionally, death. It is transmitted through food or water contaminated by the feces of an infected person. There is no cure.

By Kenji Hall

Organizers said Tuesday that the film "The Great Gatsby," with Leonardo DiCaprio in the title role and directed by Australian Baz Luhrmann, will open this year's Cannes festival -- in 3D, no less

The Cannes Film Festival has an American flavor this year, https://www.ucipalri.online - https://www.ucipalri.online with a Hollywood icon heading the jury and a quintessential U.S. literary - http://edition.cnn.com/search/?text=literary figure opening the event: The Great Gatsby.

Organizers said Tuesday that the film "The Great Gatsby," with Leonardo DiCaprio in the title role and directed by Australian Baz Luhrmann, will open this year's Cannes festival -- in 3D, no less.

Luhrmann stressed the film's French connection, saying in a statement that author F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote "some of the most poignant and beautiful passages" of "The Great Gatsby" at a French Riviera villa not far from Cannes. Tobey Maguire, Isla Fisher and Carey Mulligan also star in Luhrmann's version of the 1925 novel. Rapper Jay-Z composed the film's score.

"It is a great honor for all those who have worked on 'The Great Gatsby' to open the Cannes Film Festival," Luhrmann said in a statement. "We are thrilled to return to a country, place and festival that has always been so close to our hearts, not only because my first film, 'Strictly Ballroom,' was screened there 21 years ago, but also because F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote some of the most poignant and beautiful passages of his extraordinary novel just a short distance away at a villa outside St. Raphael."

Steven Spielberg is heading the jury at the Cannes festival this year, which runs May 15-26.

In addition, the report said, a lack of quality control over dose reconstructions made it difficult to determine how doses were calculated

"The veterans have legitimate complaints about their radiation dose reconstructions," said John E. Till, chairman of the National Research Council committee that prepared the report.

"Doses were often underestimated, sometimes considerably," he said Thursday at a briefing accompanying release of the report. "Many key assumptions and methods used are not appropriate ... many calculations are illogical or not explained."

Updating the estimates might make a difference in some cases, Till said. However, he added that the committee does not believe it would significantly affect the number of awards made.

"Perhaps a few more veterans who filed claims in the past would have been compensated" if the estimates had been more credible, he said.

Veterans with any of 21 types of cancer are already automatically granted compensation, and the dose estimates are used to determine payment for veterans with some other illnesses and types of cancer.

If the program is continued, improvements need to be made, said Till, adding that Congress and the Defense Department need to take a hard look at if and how it should go forward.

"The program itself is based on some good science," Till said, but quality assurance has been very weak and the department has done a poor job of communicating with the affected veterans.

Joe Violante, national legislative director of Disabled American Veterans, said his group has serious concerns about trying to use estimates to determine if illness is service connected.

He favors assuming that a disease that may be connected to radiation is service-related in the case of atomic-exposed veterans. The money spent on making exposure estimates could have been better spent helping affected veterans, he said.

Fred Allingham of the National Association of Radiation Survivors said that currently most cancers are now assumed to be caused by the exposure, but there have been few studies of the potential effect of radiation on illnesses such as heart and autoimmune disease.

Between 1945 and 1962 the United States conducted about 200 atmospheric nuclear-weapons tests, often with military personnel observing from shipboard or in trenches or buildings some distance from the blast. Most were exposed to radiation from fallout rather than directly from the blast.

The report concluded that the Defense Department's Defense Threat Reduction Agency should re-evaluate the methods it uses to estimate these doses and urged establishment of an independent system to oversee - http://www.thefashionablehousewife.com/?s=oversee the program.

The program has assessed about 4,000 exposures, but it takes a fairly high dose to be awarded a claim, said Till, president of Risk Assessment Corp. in Neeses, S.C. Only about 50 claims have been awarded, he said.

The committee randomly picked 99 cases for review, including military personnel who were either involved in nuclear-weapons tests in New Mexico, Nevada and the Pacific; prisoners of war in Japan when Hiroshima and Nagasaki were bombed; or personnel stationed in Japan after the war.

Film badges that record radiation were the main system to estimate doses of radiation, but many of the badges have been lost and not all participants wore them or kept them on at all times, the committee noted.

The defense agency estimates the possible range of radiation that a veteran making a claim might have been exposed to and then reports to the Veterans Administration an estimate set at 95 percent of the highest possible exposure, https://www.jhan8e5ym.online - https://www.jhan8e5ym.online called the upper bound dose. That dose is then used to calculate the likelihood that the illness is related to the radiation.

In many cases the upper bound doses were not calculated correctly and are lower than they should be, Till said.

In addition, the report said, a lack of quality control over dose reconstructions made it difficult to determine how doses were calculated - http://www.fool.com/search/solr.aspx?q=calculated . Questionable assumptions about soldiers' location and duration of exposure also contributed to the lower estimates.

The council is an arm of the National Academy of Sciences, a private organization chartered by Congress to advise the government of scientific matters.

An international team of researchers studying the genetic code of two subtypes of HIV-2 reported that one type first entered the human population before 1940 and the other before 1945

HIV-2, which is common in West Africa, is genetically different from HIV-1, the virus that has spread around the world, also causing AIDS.

An international team of researchers studying the genetic code of two subtypes of HIV-2 reported that one type first entered the human population before 1940 and the other before 1945.

Their findings are reported in Tuesday's online edition - http://data.gov.uk/data/search?q=edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Certain viruses can pass from animals to humans, and scientists believe that both forms of HIV are related to SIV, simian immunodeficiency virus.

AIDS caused by HIV-2 didn't reach epidemic proportions in West Africa until the 1960s, said Annemie Vandamme of Catholic University in Leuven, Belgium, 바카라사이트 - http://tornadoterrys.com/getDiscount.asp?nike-blue-white-sock-dart-p-652... one of the researchers.

The disease first appeared in Guinea-Bissau, and its sharp increase coincided with the war of independence there between 1963 and 1974. That may have been because of use of non-sterile injections during the war, along with increased sexual activity, Vandamme said.

Guinea-Bissau was a colony of Portugal, and the report noted that the first European cases of HIV-2 were Portuguese veterans who had served during that war.

A previous analysis of the evolutionary tree of HIV-1 indicated it moved into humans around 1930.

But she said the industry must live up to its responsibilities

Gro Harlem Brundtland, director-general of the U.N. health agency, described the talks as a "positive beginning." Senior figures from companies including Nestle, Unilever, The Coca-Cola Company, The Kellogg Company, PepsiCo Inc., Cadbury Schweppes plc, and McDonald's attended.

"We have seen a major shift away from traditional diets, and the increased consumption of energy-dense diets with high levels of fats and sugars, as well as salt. At the same time, the consumption of fruit and vegetables is going down," Brundtland told the meeting.

"As a result of all these factors, as well as tobacco use, the global profile of disease is changing. Cardiovascular disease, cancers, diabetes, respiratory disease, obesity and other non-communicable conditions now account for approximately 60 percent of the 56.5 million global deaths annually," she said.

The former Norwegian prime minister, who is a medical doctor by training, said WHO wanted to work with rather than against the food industry. But she said the industry must live up to its responsibilities.

"We would like food companies in some countries to promote smaller portions. We would like to see real moves to cut the amount of fat, sugars and salt in foods. We think consumers have a basic right to know what they are eating and the effects it can have on them. That means clear, informative, accurate and scientifically proven labeling of food products' benefits or potential harmful effects."

"And we want food companies to reassess what they are marketing to young children, and how they are going about it."

WHO now plans to meet representatives of consumer groups — many of which accuse the food and drink industry of trying to undermine WHO's proposed global strategy on diet, physical activity and health. The strategy is meant to be adopted by WHO's annual assembly in 2004 and will form the basis of international policy for years to come.

Francois-Xavier Perroud, spokesman for Nestle — the world's biggest food and beverage company — said that the industry wanted to work together with WHO. He said that success in the battle against obesity and ill health would come "not through opposing opinions and attitudes" but through cooperation - http://www.alexa.com/search?q=cooperation&r=topsites_index&p=bigtop based on sound science.

The meeting comes in the wake of a controversial WHO report which — for the first time — said that people should cut consumption of sugar to less than 10 percent of their calories and reiterated findings that fats should account for 15-30 percent of energy intake.

The report infuriated the industry. The Sugar Association, https://www.scdnkfds.online - https://www.scdnkfds.online which represents U.S. growers and refiners, slammed it as "misguided and non-science-based" and a waste of taxpayer's money. It threatened to lobby the U.S. Congress to challenge the U.S. contribution of US$406 million to WHO. The U.S. National Soft Drink Association and the Grocery Manufacturers of America, the world's largest association of food and beverage companies, also oppose the 10 percent limit.

In her speech to the meeting, Brundtland defended the report's recommendations.

Pekka Puska, WHO director of non-communicable disease, said the talks focussed on future cooperation rather than specific criticism of WHO's recommendations.

"There were some questions about the report, but the criticism wasn't taken up by either Pepsi or Coca Cola," he said.

"We acknowledge it was a first dialogue," he said. "It's quite clear that industry has their agenda, we have our agenda. But we agree that if we want to change toward healthier diets, that we have to continue the dialogue."

By CLARE NULLIS

National Security Council declined to comment Friday and BND didn't immediately return a call seeking comment

BERLIN -- Germany summoned the U.S. ambassador in Berlin on Friday following the arrest of a man reported to have spied for the United States, heightening friction between the two countries over alleged U.S. eavesdropping in Germany.

U.S. Ambassador John B. Emerson was called in "in connection with an investigation by the federal prosecutor," the German Foreign Ministry said in a statement. The U.S. envoy "was asked to help in the swift clarification" of the case, it added.

Federal prosecutors say a 31-year-old German man was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of spying for foreign intelligence services. They did not identify the suspect or the intelligence services.

German government spokesman Steffen Seibert told reporters that Chancellor Angela Merkel been personally informed of the arrest.

He declined to comment on reports - http://lerablog.org/?s=reports by Der Spiegel magazine and the daily Sueddeutsche Zeitung that the man worked for Germany's foreign intelligence service, known by its German acronym BND.

The newspapers, which didn't identify their sources, said the man was suspected of passing on information about a German parliamentary committee investigating the activities of U.S. and other intelligence agencies in Germany. He claimed to have worked with U.S. intelligence since 2012, they reported.

Seibert said members of the parliamentary panel had also been informed of the arrest.

Reports that the National Security Agency spied on German citizens, including on Merkel's cellphone, have caused friction between Berlin and Washington since they were first published last year, based on documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

Martina Renner, a member of the opposition Left Party on the parliamentary panel, said the case indicated that anyone who examined Snowden's revelations in detail was subject to scrutiny by U.S. intelligence agencies.

Her panel heard testimony Thursday from two former NSA employees, Thomas Drake and William Binney.

"If the media reports (about the case) are confirmed then there can't just be a legal response, there also has to be a political response," she said.

In his testimony, Drake claimed that cooperation between the NSA and https://www.fqphhcan4.online - https://www.fqphhcan4.online Germany's BND greatly increased after the 9/11 terror attacks in the United States. He described the German spy agency as an "appendage" of the NSA.

Seibert said Merkel discussed "foreign policy matters" in a telephone conversation with President Barack Obama late Thursday. He said the conversation focused on Ukraine but wouldn't say whether the arrest was also discussed.

The U.S. National Security Council declined to comment Friday and BND didn't immediately return a call seeking comment.

Another 69 cases on Sunday raised its infection tally to 4,948

In a new restriction, all passengers on Taipei's subway system now must wear medical masks. When the measure came into force on Sunday, the usual din of conversation on trains was absent as masked people sat quietly. Many wore baseball hats, apparently hoping to get extra protection against the virus. At train depots, cleaners scrubbed hand rails of cars with bleach-dipped cloths.

The worldwide death toll from severe acute respiratory syndrome was at least 536 on Sunday with 11 new deaths — six in China, three in Hong Kong, and one each in Taiwan and Singapore. More than 7,300 people have been infected in over 25 countries.

Also, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder went ahead with a Southeast Asian tour while a top U.S. university slightly eased a ban on students from SARS-hit countries.

As Japan sent two infectious disease experts to China to help, optimistic Beijing officials maintained the capital's SARS outbreak is waning. However, the city's Communist Party secretary talked tough after the World Health Organization complained about holes in patient data.

"We can't allow the slightest relaxation in the fight against SARS in May," the party's People's Daily newspaper quoted Liu Qi as saying.

He ordered officials to "make utmost efforts to fight Beijing's May battle against SARS and obtain total victory in the work of SARS prevention."

China remains the hardest hit country with at least 240 SARS deaths. Another 69 cases on Sunday raised its infection tally to 4,948. Thousands more are being kept in quarantine amid fears that the disease is spreading from cities and into the impoverished countryside, where medical facilities - http://www.ajaxtime.com/?s=medical%20facilities would not be able to cope with a sweeping epidemic.

New infection rates have dropped dramatically in Beijing in recent days. Only 42 new cases were reported Sunday along with four deaths in the city.

But WHO says it is too early to declare that the capital's outbreak has peaked. It says Beijing health authorities can't explain how about half of its more than 2,200 SARS patients caught the virus — an omission in data that hinders attempts to fight its spread.

Taiwan announced the death of a hospital nurse that raised its toll to 19. It also reported 12 new cases on Sunday, and https://www.urajoa2uj.online - https://www.urajoa2uj.online officials fear the illness is spreading from Taipei and through the south of the island.

In response, Taiwan is installing video cameras to keep watch over about 8,000 people quarantined in their homes in case they have contracted the illness.

Video surveillance was ordered after three-times-a-day phone call checks by health officials were being circumvented by people who broke the quarantine by leaving home and forwarding all calls to their mobile phones.

SARS has killed 18 people and infected 184 in Taiwan, where the transmission pattern is described as high by WHO's Web site.

In Hong Kong, 215 people have died and 1,678 infected. Only four new cases were reported Sunday confirming a falling infection rate that, along with warmer weather, has persuaded many people to stop wearing masks.

Business people and tourism officials, worried about Hong Kong's image, have welcomed their growing abandonment.

"You can't see our smile when we put the masks on," said James Lu, executive director - http://www.futureofeducation.com/main/search/search?q=executive%20director of the Hong Kong Hotels Association.

Also in the territory, Dr. David Ho, a researcher who helped pioneer a drug cocktail treatment for AIDS patients, said there had been promising results from laboratory tests on the SARS virus using an anti-HIV treatment, synthetic peptides — amino acids that slow AIDS in an expensive drug called Fuzeon.

Tests using animals could take place soon. But it was too early to use such medications to treat human SARS patients.

"We're not saying this is the drug to treat (SARS) patients tomorrow or next month," said Ho, who is scientific director of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center in New York.

Hong Kong health officials have taken samples from a public housing complex where five cases had been found, Director of Health Margaret Chan said. A local newspaper said some residents of the building had fled fearing they would be subjected to strict quarantine.

Meanwhile, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder Sunday arrived in Malaysia, which has reported two SARS deaths. His five-day tour also takes him to Singapore, where SARS has claimed 27 lives, Indonesia and Vietnam, which appears to have beaten an outbreak that killed five.

Schroeder had planned originally to take a delegation of 120. However, this was cut to 30 because of the SARS threat.

In Geneva, the international basketball federation, FIBA, said it might move the July 10-20 junior men's World Championships from Malaysia to the Greek capital, Athens, because of SARS.

In the United States, the University of California at Berkeley eased a ban on students from SARS-affected areas of Asia who have enrolled in summer school, saying it will welcome about 80 students from Taiwan, China and Hong Kong who have enrolled in core academic classes.

But it will maintain a ban on nearly 600 English language students. About US$1 million in fees will be refunded.

A civil rights group, Chinese for Affirmative Action, says the ban is discriminatory and too broad.

Nine have died

Company officials have discussed the proposal with ethics experts and https://www.wexzi5ymf.online - https://www.wexzi5ymf.online believe it could be done "without compromising patients' rights or patient integrity," said Edward E. Berger, the company's vice president for strategic planning and policy.But other experts raised questions.

"It's such an extraordinary experiment that informed consent is absolutely essential," said George Annas, a professor of health law and bioethics at Boston University. "I really see no way you could justify this without the individual's consent."

Abiomed has gained worldwide attention for its trial of the Abiocor, a self-contained, implantable replacement heart. The Abiocor has been implanted in 10 people since July 2001. Nine have died. The 10th is in stable condition at the Texas Heart Institute in Houston, more than two months after the operation - http://www.exeideas.com/?s=operation .

So far, the clinical trial has used patients with end-stage heart failure who have a 70 percent chance of dying within a month and no hope of other treatment.

The company's proposal concerns people who have suffered massive heart attacks, who still have little chance of surviving, but who are otherwise healthier because they haven't been debilitated by a long-term progressive condition.

These patients are frequently heavily sedated or being kept alive by life support.

Berger said the company hopes it will suffice to have a previously authorized health care proxy — usually a relative — consent to the implant.

Proxies allow a relative to make a decision about treatment for a patient unable to express his or her wishes. But it's not clear if laws on medical proxies would allow a relative to put a patient in a medical experiment.

"I guess the question is: Is society comfortable with the notion that somebody can give their body to science while they're still alive, but are no longer conscious and aren't able to give their consent?" asked Jonathan Moreno, director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Virginia.

Pages

Subscribe to Political Debate on Iran RSS