But it's a response not seen with standard chemotherapy for this cancer, "so this was impressive," said Dr

Scientists hope Velcade, or similar drugs, could one day become effective for other cancers.

The drug is the first anticancer proteasome inhibitor, meaning it targets an enzyme key to cell growth. Uncontrolled cell growth is cancer's hallmark. The idea: Inhibit proteasome action, and chemicals that control cell growth should be disrupted enough for cancer cells to die.

Velcade maker Millennium Pharmaceuticals first tried the approach to treat multiple myeloma, a usually fatal blood cancer that strikes 14,600 Americans a year. The condition is treatable - http://www.dict.cc/?s=treatable but incurable, and patients eventually run out of options. Half die within five years of diagnosis.

Velcade isn't a cure either, but studies suggest it can help a fraction of patients who have exhausted other alternatives, the Food and Drug Administration ruled late Tuesday.

The FDA approved Velcade's sale less than four months after Millennium filed its application, under a special program that lets promising drugs for life-threatening illnesses sell before there's final proof of how well they work.

Millennium gave Velcade injections to 188 patients who had relapsed despite about six prior https://www.umammuowc.online - https://www.umammuowc.online therapies. Some 28 percent improved, and that improvement lasted a median of one year — a surprising length of time for people so sick, the FDA said.

The FDA is requiring Cambridge, Mass.-based Millennium to do further research to prove if that response actually translates into living longer.

But it's a response not seen with standard chemotherapy for this cancer, "so this was impressive," said Dr. Ann Farrell, who led FDA's - https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/led%20FDA%27s review.

Evidence so far suggests "this represents a true advance over existing therapies," added FDA oncology chief Dr. Richard Pazdur.

Normal cells contain proteasome, too, making them vulnerable to the drug. Side effects include many typical of chemotherapy: nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, headache, decreased appetite, decreased blood cell production, and a nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy.

Still, for some unknown reason, Velcade, known chemically as bortezomib, appeared more likely to select myeloma cells, Farrell said.

Millennium plans to begin shipping Velcade by month's end. It will cost about $20,000 per average course of treatment — 16 to 17 weeks — which is comparable to other injected cancer therapies, according to Barry Greene, the company's general manager in charge of oncology.

Millennium is studying whether Velcade also could treat advanced colon and lung cancer.

Ann Farrell, who led FDA's review

Scientists hope Velcade, or similar drugs, could one day become effective for other cancers.

The drug is the first anticancer proteasome inhibitor, meaning it targets an enzyme key to cell growth. Uncontrolled cell growth is cancer's hallmark. The idea: Inhibit proteasome action, and chemicals that control cell growth should be disrupted - https://www.rewards-insiders.marriott.com/search.jspa?q=disrupted enough for cancer cells to die.

Velcade maker Millennium Pharmaceuticals first tried the approach to treat multiple myeloma, a usually fatal blood cancer that strikes 14,600 Americans a year. The condition is treatable but incurable, and patients eventually run out of options. Half die within five years of diagnosis.

Velcade isn't a cure either, https://www.srurbbzdq.online - https://www.srurbbzdq.online but studies - https://www.herfeed.com/?s=studies suggest it can help a fraction of patients who have exhausted other alternatives, the Food and Drug Administration ruled late Tuesday.

The FDA approved Velcade's sale less than four months after Millennium filed its application, under a special program that lets promising drugs for life-threatening illnesses sell before there's final proof of how well they work.

Millennium gave Velcade injections to 188 patients who had relapsed despite about six prior therapies. Some 28 percent improved, and that improvement lasted a median of one year — a surprising length of time for people so sick, the FDA said.

The FDA is requiring Cambridge, Mass.-based Millennium to do further research to prove if that response actually translates into living longer.

But it's a response not seen with standard chemotherapy for this cancer, "so this was impressive," said Dr. Ann Farrell, who led FDA's review.

Evidence so far suggests "this represents a true advance over existing therapies," added FDA oncology chief Dr. Richard Pazdur.

Normal cells contain proteasome, too, making them vulnerable to the drug. Side effects include many typical of chemotherapy: nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, headache, decreased appetite, decreased blood cell production, and a nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy.

Still, for some unknown reason, Velcade, known chemically as bortezomib, appeared more likely to select myeloma cells, Farrell said.

Millennium plans to begin shipping Velcade by month's end. It will cost about $20,000 per average course of treatment — 16 to 17 weeks — which is comparable to other injected cancer therapies, according to Barry Greene, the company's general manager in charge of oncology.

Millennium is studying whether Velcade also could treat advanced colon and lung cancer.

AIDS caused by HIV-2 didn't reach epidemic proportions in West Africa until the 1960s, said Annemie Vandamme of Catholic University in Leuven, Belgium, one of the researchers

HIV-2, which is common in West Africa, is genetically different from HIV-1, the virus that has spread around the world, also causing AIDS.

An international team of researchers studying the genetic code of two subtypes of HIV-2 reported that one type first entered the human population before 1940 and the other before 1945.

Their findings are reported in Tuesday's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Certain viruses can pass from animals to humans, and scientists believe that both forms of HIV are related to SIV, simian immunodeficiency virus.

AIDS caused by HIV-2 didn't reach epidemic proportions in West Africa until the 1960s, said Annemie Vandamme of Catholic University in Leuven, Belgium, one of the researchers.

The disease first appeared in Guinea-Bissau, and its sharp increase coincided with the war of independence there between 1963 and 1974. That may have been because of use of non-sterile injections during the war, along with increased sexual activity, Vandamme - https://www.jamendo.com/en/search?qs=fq=license_cc:(-nc%20AND%20-nd)&q=Vandamme said.

Guinea-Bissau - http://www.express.co.uk/search/Guinea-Bissau/ was a colony of Portugal, and https://www.gpndy7mw9.online - https://www.gpndy7mw9.online the report noted that the first European cases of HIV-2 were Portuguese veterans who had served during that war.

A previous analysis of the evolutionary tree of HIV-1 indicated it moved into humans around 1930.

Brandon Hantz: I'm not very good at "Survivor"

Brandon Hantz was sent home from Wednesday night's "Survivor: Caramoan" in perhaps the most dramatic exit ever -- at an Immunity Challenge that morphed into a Tribal Council when his tribe forfeited following Brandon's camp-wide rampage that culminated with him dumping their stock of rice and beans into the sand.

ETonline interviewed the 21-year-old chemical disposal worker from Katy, Texas, the day after his ouster aired. Read on for the rambling Q&A that touches on everything from whether he regrets dumping the rice and beans (Hint: not at all), to the shoulder massage - http://search.un.org/search?ie=utf8&site=un_org&output=xml_no_dtd&client... host Jeff Probst gave him at the Immunity Challenge, to being forgiven for his sins, and to his dream of coming back to the show to compete with his infamous uncle Russell Hantz. All with pop culture references to YouTube bullies, a popular video game, and Justin Timberlake thrown in.

ETonline: You and Phillip had been going back and forth for awhile, what was it about the interaction with him that pushed you over the edge?

Brandon Hantz: Very demeaning, very disrespectful, very just like "Daddy-ish," he wanted to play God and dad and everything else. ... He was the leader in some weird, weird, weird way. Sick, if you ask me. He's a silly guy ... It's entertaining, to see him be weird.

ETonline: So, even in the beginning of the episode, you mentioned that you had thought about spoiling the rice and beans if you were going to end up going home, and then you ended up spilling the rice and beans, what was your thought when you did that?

Hantz: My thought was, if they take a million dollars from me, I'm gonna take two days worth of rice, I mean, come on. I think it's a fair trade. I think I got the dirty end of the stick, but it was hilarious, was it not?

ETonline: It was entertaining, it's true. But I guess I'm wondering, on the episode we see you clashing with Phillip a lot, but it seemed like you were getting along pretty well with everyone else.

Hantz: Yeah, I was. ... It was kind of disheartening, to see my friends down talk me like I'm supposed to be in a hospital. Everybody had to live with Phillip too and everybody was just as disgusted. They were just bitter that they didn't have any rice and beans, and they wanted to trash me. The people that wanted to play to the cameras are Andrea, Malcolm, Corinne, Phillip and Cochrane for that matter. Ugh. He does nothing. ... I have no problem with these guys in real life, but, dude, as far as I'm concerned, man, those people aren't real reality TV. ...

When you're behind those cameras, there's so many fake people that just like to play up to the cameras -- bandwagon-hoppers, is what I call them. They like to jump on whatever's good, you know? ... If I would have been in the alliance with Phillip, they wouldn't have talked to me the way that they did. It would've been okay to vote off Phillip. But as Corinne said in the last scenes for the next episode, she said he's the craziest person, or she said, he's the most annoying person to ever play "Survivor." And that was what I was trying to portray. But when I approached everyone, it was like, 'Oh, let's ignore him,' so we'll see how it works out for Corinne. So, I mean, you should've listened when you had the chance. Now, you may be voted out. You never know.

ETonline: When you say that they were playing to the camera, what did you see being there, that we didn't see at home?

Hantz: I saw a bunch of people that were being really nice. I mean, we all got along really well, we played games. That's why Andrea was crying, because she was like, "Wow, I really screwed this guy." ... I really liked my tribe. I did not like the fact that they were being manipulated - http://topofblogs.com/tag/manipulated by Phillip, 광주출장안마 - https://www.popanma.com/%ea%b4%91%ec%a3%bc%ec%b6%9c%ec%9e%a5%ec%83%b5%cf... or really, just going along with him. You don't go along with somebody like that, you cut the head off the snake, like I say, or you end up getting screwed yourself. ... I see a bunch of followers out there and I'm a leader. That's what I do -- I lead stuff. And I make stuff happen and pour rice and beans out and whatnot.

ETonline: So, speaking of the rice and beans, do you regret that, or do you stand by that decision?

Hantz: I definitely stand by that decision. It was awesome. Did you not see their faces? [Laughing] It was epic! It was almost as cool as [video game] Modern Warfare 3. I'm just saying.

ETonline: Did you feel guilty at all, because maybe they might go hungry for a couple days?

Hantz: That's okay. It's "Survivor."

ETonline: Talking about the Immunity Challenge -- were you surprised that Jeff started the Tribal Council right there at the immunity challenge?

Hantz: [Laughing] It was awesome. The whole episode was amazing. You've got to understand, I have absolute confidence in the way that ... maybe because I was being picked on so much? For example, have you watched [the] YouTube [video] where the fat kid was getting picked on by the little bitty skinny kid and finally the fat kid just straight up power bombs him on the concrete? It was awesome, and everybody was cheering for that little guy. Why? Because he's been slapped and punched and kicked and finally he takes up for himself. Do you think he regrets it? Hell no. That little kid's like, I'm about to go eat me some donuts and play me some Modern Warfare 3. And that's exactly what he did. How do you regret something like that?

Aside from [that] I love Jesus, I love my faith, I'm a Christian, you know, and I know it gets tired, people hearing all about it, but still, I'm not gonna change my beliefs just because I didn't represent the way I was supposed to. I'm not perfect, like I said the last season, but at the same time, I would say conviction did set in for me, you know. ... It's important to me to do the right thing, at all times, but I can say that I'm forgiven for it, so I don't really have any problem with what happened. It was a year ago. Would I do it again? No. Of course not. Okay I can't say that I wouldn't do it again. [Laughing] I don't know really what I would do, but obviously I would try my best for it not to get to that point, for me having to spill rice and beans to prove a point.

But all I was doing was proving a point ... [that] you can't always get to eat. You can't just make somebody feel like garbage and then just not have consequences for it. And it's such a little consequence, I mean, come on, you're on Survivor, we're starving already, go fish for something. I was cooking everything, I was picking up around the shelter. You're taking my chance of winning a million dollars, you're taking my money away from me and my family, so, rice and beans? Cry me a river. Cry me a river, like Justin Timberlake said. You know what I'm saying?

ETonline: [At the Immunity Challenge] Jeff was kind of holding you, Jeff separated you from the tribe...

Hantz: Oh, Jeff has the softest hands ever. It is amazing. Jeff, I'm down for another massage if that is cool with you. Just fly me in, real quick shoulder, maybe a foot, because I'd like to see how them soft hands would do on my feet. Jeff's awesome, man, I respect him. ... And any [members of the] production [team], man. I've never given production trouble, one time, one time. ... And they all respect me as a person, maybe not as a player. I'm not a very good player. I'm good at being myself and I'm good at challenges, but as far as "Survivor" strategy is concerned, I'm in the low, low averages, I would say. But I definitely respect Jeff, and if he asked anything of me, as I was out there or even in life, if he needed a favor, if he needed help, I would be there for him. The guy is not just a host, a great host, he's a good person. And that's hard to come by, because some of these guys think they're too sexy for their shucks sort of thing, and he's a real person, for sure, and I respect him a lot.

ETonline: If he hadn't separated you, do you think you would have gotten physical with Phillip?

Hantz: I think it could've got there, of course. I can't lie and say that wasn't a possibility, but I think even in the midst of my anger, I did have control. As you've seen, I showed a lot of restraint. A lot of restraint. The only thing that really could've ended up bad for him was if he would've approached me. And kept talking about my family. But, you know, he's not stupid like that.

I know he's a pretty ignorant guy sometimes, "Survivor"-wise now, this isn't in real life, but as far as "Survivor," very, very ignorant. But as far as, you know, life is concerned, I can't make that call. I respect the guy, and I'd have no problem shaking his hand and being friends with him. Now would he do that with me? Doubtful. 'Cause, you know, not everybody's forgiving and forgetful, but I would hope.

ETonline: Watching you on two seasons of "Survivor," and seeing your uncle on two seasons of "Survivor," you both talk about the Hantz family name a lot.

Hantz: Very prideful. Very prideful family.

ETonline: Does your family put a lot of pressure on you to be a certain way?

Hantz: No, no, the pressure's there, for everyone. It's a lot of pressure for everybody. I can't just put it on me. It's kind of a selfish thing for me to do. We're a very, very prideful family. We have the biggest hearts in the world, but you cross us and it's not a good thing. That doesn't mean physical, but if we don't tear you down verbally and intellectually - 'cause most people think these guys are stupid, you know, trailer trash. A lot of that -- trailer trash country boys that just have a temper. You have no idea of the intellectual capacity we have. ... There's a lot of pride, there's a lot of defensiveness we have towards people because of the stereotype they put us under. And that's even before "Survivor," we can't blame that on "Survivor." ... We really love and respect our family and our friends, and we're very, very loyal and we'll help you out in any way, shape or form.

ETonline: What is your relationship with your uncle Russell like right now?

Hantz: Awesome. He's never been more prouder of me. ... We had a bad season to where we really didn't like each other. I mean, it was legitimate -- he wanted to make my life hell, I wanted to make his life hell. But there's always been a physical respect and nothing ever gets physical, because it's just not like that. We don't always resort to that kind of stuff, we very rarely resort to that actually. ... we just came to a conclusion that look -- we may not agree on everything, but we are family. And we're gonna have to live with each other and if anything were to happen to my Uncle Russell, I'd be devastated. So I texted him, and I told him, I love you Uncle Russell and I hope everything goes good for you. We're so much the same. When two people are so much alike, there's always going to be confrontation. Always.

And we both really want to compete against each other. ... That would be such an honor and a privilege to play ["Survivor"] with my uncle, my own family, that would do so much for the Hantz name. And on top of that, [I] would be so paranoid. And [when] the paranoia sets in - it makes even better TV, in my opinion, [since] I don't know if I can trust him on "Survivor." The dynamic between us -- I can see a lot of confrontation. At the same time, we would have each other there. There could possibly be an alliance there. ... But there's also a good possibility that we could be gunning for each other, so I'm actually excited to see if that's even a possibility. Plus, I hold the record for the most weight held, with Jim Rice, and really I held it like 30 seconds longer than he did, so I hold the record, just sayin'. And [Russell] swears that he can beat me. I'm like, okay old man, so let's keep dreaming. I'm the new Hantz, and the new one's always better than the old.

Survivor airs Wednesday night at 8 p.m. on CBS.

"This regulation imposes big city values on us (small papers)," said Tonda Rush, counsel to the National Newspaper Association, a trade group for small papers

Aesthetics was not the point.

The wall was knocked down two months ago to ease patient traffic that often clustered around the reception desk because someone lingering around might see a medical file. Such an accidental glance now could be construed as a federal offense.

Federal regulations that went into effect April 14 mandate that health providers, insurance companies and pharmacies limit disclosures of patients' medical information. Providers have spent millions of dollars and countless hours readying for the privacy portion of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, known as HIPAA.

Compliance has meant changes big and small, from building or tearing down walls, to door locks on rooms with patient files, to removing bulletin boards with patient notes to upgrading software and computer systems.

Enforcement is another matter. The Department of Health and Human Services has hired only 40 people to monitor compliance, so surprise or regular inspections aren't part the review plan. Instead, HHS is counting on individuals to report infractions. It estimates that 21,000 complaints will be filed in the first year; in the first 2 1/2 weeks, 70 were registered.

HHS spokesman Bill Pierce said half the complaints probably won't be privacy-related, and facts and circumstances would determine how the agency proceeds.

For example, he said, leaving a medical file out on a desk once wouldn't necessarily be a violation, but doing it repeatedly most likely would be.

Mazlin and Shaw, Manhattan obstetricians and gynecologists, thought removing the wall was necessary.

"There could be medical charts on the desk, on the computer screen," said Barbara Velez, who manages the practice. "We had to find a way to reduce that traffic."

The regulations mandate that doctors, hospitals and insurers notify patients of the privacy regulations, describing how their medical information may be used and their rights under the new rules. Directions on how to report violations must also be included, and patients must be told they have a right to review their records, request errors be changed and limit who has access to it.

Many health care providers have been giving patients forms detailing their rights, and asking patients to sign releases.

News organizations can also be affected by the regulations, and are concerned about restrictions on information important to the public. If, for example, victims of disasters, accidents or crimes are taken to a hospital, officials might not release any information without patients' consent, making it nearly impossible to learn the names and conditions of the injured.

Those regulated by the rule are leaving nothing to chance.

"The preparation was massive - massive and all-consuming," said Kathryn Bakich, vice president-national director for health care compliance at The Segal Co., a benefits consulting firm.

"People are getting hysterical. There is a lot of wiggle room in the regulations, so people have to decide what is a reasonable effort at compliance and what is not."

Penalties for privacy violations range from a $100 fine to up to a $250,000 fine and 10 years in prison. The most severe punishment is reserved for people who intended to sell medical information for personal or financial gain or to harm the patient.

So far, patients have had little reaction. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston provided patients with a phone number to call if they had HIPAA questions, but many of the calls have been to check on doctor's appointments.

When Robin Ruffner went into a Manhattan hospital last week for plastic surgery, she was irritated at having to sign a form when she was jittery about the procedure.

"I was really nervous and didn't feel like reading a form. I think it would have been better if they gave me them a week before when I wasn't nervous," the 31-year old social worker said.

Ruffner also signed a HIPAA release form at a visit to the allergist earlier this month. But overall, Ruffner said, she doesn't mind signing the forms because she thinks laws to protect patients' medical records - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/search/?queryText=records are a good idea.

The medical community has spent vast amounts to show patients and the government it is serious protecting medical records. The University of Texas at Galveston has spent about $1.5 million, not counting all the personnel time, on compliance. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates compliance will cost the industry $17.6 billion over 10 years.

Some observers worry that these costs will trickle down to consumers, but HHS spokesman Pierce said efficiencies from electronic transfer of records will save nearly $30 billion over the same time. One of HIPAA's mandates is to standardize the electronic transfer of patient records, but this part of the regulations does not go into full effect until Oct. 16.

Bakich said health insurers are telling clients administrative costs will rise because of updating systems to comply with the regulations, which in turn could increase premiums.

"This comes at a bad time because health care costs were going up anyway," Bakich said.

Despite the legions of businesses offering HIPAA advice, health executives say one of the challenging aspects of compliance is deciphering the rules and figuring out what is necessary to comply.

"People would go to one conference and hear one thing and someone else would go to another conference and hear something else," said Shelley Witter, manager of information systems at Galveston.

Galveston had to update its computer system so it could make a list of patients who had to be informed of the regulations and track them as they were. It also had to record who might have received information without the patient's consent, which is allowed in certain circumstances such as reporting suspected child abuse.

Another delicate issue has been implementing the regulations without negatively affecting communication between hospitals and doctors and their patients and patients' families and loved ones.

Pierce said hospitals and doctors use their judgment about which family members and friends should receive a patient's medical information. But now many doctors and hospitals are asking patients to put it in writing.

Some units at MCG hospital in Augusta, Ga., have patients create a password given to those authorized to speak with the medical staff.

"This way people can get updates," Regina Maier, of the MCG Health System. "The communication issue becomes harder when so many people live far from family and friends."

Meanwhile, journalists are still grappling with the laws. In small towns, printing the names of people who went into the hospital or https://www.scjbible.kr/ - https://www.scjbible.kr/ nursing home was common and advocates say such practices unified a community.

"This regulation imposes big city values on us (small papers)," said Tonda Rush, counsel to the National Newspaper Association, a trade group for small papers.

Rush also fears the new regulations will silence potential whistle blowers from speaking to journalists because their actions could be considered HIPAA violations.

"The confusions and doubts about the law could keep people quiet," Rush said.

By Theresa Agovino

Miley Cyrus Triumphs At Kids' Choice

It was also a slime spectacle for the Nickelodeon children's television network, which broadcast the 21st annual show live from UCLA's Pauley Pavilion in front of 10,000 screaming fans, almost all of them teens and preteens - http://www.ehow.com/search.html?s=preteens .

At an outdoor event hosted by boxer Laila Ali and displayed on giant screens at the show, several stars did battle with the network's trademark green slime. Akon crashed a dune buggy into giant containers of the goo, Usher blasted a sumo wrestler several yards with slime fired from a cannon and supermodel Heidi Klum, attached to a bungee cord and wearing a specially equipped "butt spike belt," flung herself into a wall covered with slime-filled balloons.

The show always draws A-list stars who seem to enjoy the show as much as the screaming kids in the audience. No star is safe from the slime, as this year's victims Harrison Ford, Brendan Fraser and Orlando Bloom can attest.

In the categories that were announced, teen heartthrob Drake Bell was another double winner, collecting his third consecutive orange blimp-shaped trophy for favorite TV actor and another for favorite TV show for "Drake and Josh."

"Drake and Josh" upset Cyrus' hit program "Hannah Montana" in the TV show category.

Other winners were Eddie Murphy for favorite voice from an animated movie for "Shrek the Third," "American Idol" for favorite reality show and, one of the biggest crowd favorites of the night, the Jonas Brothers for favorite music group. The ever-polite Jonas Brothers each offered brief thank-yous. Chris Brown won for favorite male singer.

Ryan Seacrest accepted the reality show award saying he looked forward to presenting it to "two of the three" of the show's judges.

Cyrus, in a black dress with silver spangles, thanked several people, including her mother, father, agent, manager "and my lord and savior Jesus Christ."

She returned a few minutes later to perform her song, and had a camera crew scampering to get out of the way when she charged into the audience, https://www.sdglv19y3.online - https://www.sdglv19y3.online microphone in hand.

The Naked Brothers Band also performed a song from their forthcoming album "I Don't Want To Go To School."

Cameron Diaz injected one serious moment into the 90-minute show when she accepted a silver blimp as this year's Wannabe Award winner, for the person kids most want to be like. After a montage of clips from both her movies and her efforts on behalf of environmentalism was shown, she encouraged the crowd to do their part to protect the planet.

"You're going to change the world. Every one of you kids is the future," she told the audience. "Everybody go out and make the world a better place."

Diaz, who was the first ever Kids Choice Awards burping contest winner, has long said that was the favorite of all her awards. She said this one trumped it.

Jason Lee accepted the favorite movie award for "Alvin and the Chipmunks" and said it was one of his biggest thrills.

"I'm going to hang this from the ceiling because it's the greatest award anyone could receive because it was voted on by the kids," he said as he held his blimp.

Awards are voted on by people who cast their ballots at Nickelodeon's Web site, with voting continuing until the day of the show.

The show's host, Jack Black, announced that 88 million votes were cast this year, more than twice last year's record number of 40 million.

The show concluded with Black and Bloom sitting in chairs high above the audience being drenched with what Black claimed was 27 million gallons of green slime.

21st Annual Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards Winners

The sentiment is often repeated by bar managers and employees

"I probably won't be coming back here, and not just because I'm retiring," the 67-year-old stockbroker said as he sat in the bar last week.

As of Monday, smoking is banned at all indoor workplaces citywide, including some 700 bars, restaurants and nightclubs.

Watertown, Saugus and Framingham also are going smoke-free Monday, joining a growing number of cities around the country. New York City began enforcing its month-old smoking ban on Thursday. In Massachusetts, 77 communities have adopted total public smoking bans, and many others have partial bans.

While public health officials, many nonsmokers and smokers alike say they'll appreciate the fresher air in Boston now, business owners and patrons are concerned about loss of business and ambiance, and what they feel is an infringement on their rights.

Business at restaurants and bars is already down because of the poor economy, https://www.mbpcdjrkg1.online - https://www.mbpcdjrkg1.online says Bruce Potter, membership director of the Massachusetts Restaurant Association.

"This is the most terrible time for this to be going into effect," he said.

Restaurants often have profit margins - http://www.houzz.com/?search=profit%20margins of only 3 to 5 percent, Potter said, and they suffer greatly from even the smallest sale decrease. Many owners are also bristling at being told how to run their business, he said.

Under a 1998 regulation, Boston required restaurants to partition off smoking areas or place them at least six feet from eating areas. The new regulations ban smoking everywhere but outdoors and in private homes, hotel rooms and some cigar bars.

The Boston Public Health Commission has been handing out posters and coasters to publicize the change.

"Tomorrow morning, your shirt will still smell April fresh," reads one coaster. Another asks bar patrons to think about "how many bartenders you'll save" by not smoking.

Eight public health commission inspectors will be making unannounced visits to ensure bars and nightclubs are following the new law and following up on complaints.

"Our intention is not to be the smoking police," said John Auerbach, executive director of the health commission. "We're just trying to make sure every employee at every workplace in this city is not exposed to something as dangerous and as carcinogenic as secondhand smoke."

Auerbach doesn't expect to see many problems with the enforcement of the ban, which mirrors legislation in California and New York City. In New York City, bars and restaurants that allow people to smoke can face hefty fines.

City police are prepared to deal with any safety issues that may arise, as well, Auerbach said.

Some Boston bar managers said they worry that banning smoking will create a hazard as groups of smokers huddle outside on sidewalks and in parking lots to smoke.

"I think it's going to end up being a real problem. You're not allowed to take liquor outside, and what happens outside, we can't control," Potter said.

At Mr. Dooley's bar in Boston's Financial District, bartender John Brown, 64, says he's inhaled more than his share of smoke in his 40 years on the job. He says he looks forward to the smoke-free environment, but worries about losing business.

Smokers "will just seek other alternatives," such as bars in Cambridge or Quincy, Brown said.

The sentiment is often repeated by bar managers and employees.

"Just the ban wouldn't hurt business, if it hadn't been for the fact that it's only in the city," said Shane Waldron, bartender at The Avenue in Boston's Allston area. "It's going to hurt until they do it statewide."

By Bipasha Ray

The agency will soon begin accepting bids from companies that want to supply the federal lunch program, the official said

The federal program feeds 28 million low-income school children every day, but not all of them will be eating irradiated meat. Schools will not be required to put it on the menu, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. Still, the government must have it on hand for those that want it.

The agency will soon begin accepting bids from companies that want to supply the federal lunch program, the official said.

Congress last year ordered the department to start accepting irradiation as a method of sanitizing meat for the national school lunch program. The department itself deemed the technology safe in 1999 after concluding that its benefits — preventing food poisoning — outweighed the risk of any potential side effects.

Irradiation involves directing gamma rays produced by the radioactive material, cobalt 60, or electricity at meat to kill harmful bacteria. Research shows that most of the radiation passes through without being absorbed. The small amount that does remain kills the bacteria.

Thousands of parents and consumer advocates have protested the decision to allow schools to buy the sanitized meat for meals, expressing fears that too little is known about the long-term - https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&tbm=nws&q=long-term&btnI=lucky effects of continuous consumption of the product.

The consumer group Public Citizen argues irradiation could cause cancer, but studies have shown that irradiated food is safe.

Many doctors and scientists strongly support the department's decision to put the special meat in the lunch program, say irradiation - http://www.estateguideblog.com/?s=irradiation is effective in preventing deadly cases of food poisoning.

More than 5,000 people die each year from foodborne illness, 홍천출장안마 - https://www.hongcheonopmassage.club/ according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children, the elderly and people with weak immune systems are especially vulnerable.

In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration deemed irradiation as a safe method of killing off bacteria that can cause food poisoning.

"This regulation imposes big city values on us (small papers)," said Tonda Rush, counsel to the National Newspaper Association, a trade group for small papers

Aesthetics was not the point.

The wall was knocked down two months ago to ease patient traffic that often clustered around the reception desk because someone lingering around might see a medical file. Such an accidental glance now could be construed as a federal offense.

Federal regulations that went into effect April 14 mandate that health providers, insurance companies and pharmacies limit disclosures of patients' medical information. Providers have spent millions of dollars and countless hours readying for the privacy portion of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, known as HIPAA.

Compliance has meant changes big and small, https://www.mgri9tlu.online - https://www.mgri9tlu.online from building or tearing down walls, to door locks on rooms with patient files, to removing bulletin boards with patient notes to upgrading software and computer systems.

Enforcement is another matter. The Department of Health and Human Services has hired only 40 people to monitor compliance, so surprise or regular inspections aren't part the review plan. Instead, HHS is counting on individuals to report infractions. It estimates that 21,000 complaints will be filed in the first year; in the first 2 1/2 weeks, 70 were registered.

HHS spokesman Bill Pierce said half the complaints probably won't be privacy-related, and facts and circumstances would determine how the agency proceeds.

For example, he said, leaving a medical file out on a desk once wouldn't necessarily be a violation, but doing it repeatedly most likely would be.

Mazlin and Shaw, Manhattan obstetricians and gynecologists, thought removing the wall was necessary.

"There could be medical charts on the desk, on the computer screen," said Barbara Velez, who manages the practice. "We had to find a way to reduce that traffic."

The regulations mandate that doctors, hospitals and insurers notify patients of the privacy regulations, describing how their medical information may be used and their rights under the new rules. Directions on how to report violations must also be included, and patients must be told they have a right to review their records, request errors be changed and limit who has access to it.

Many health care providers have been giving patients forms detailing their rights, and asking patients to sign releases.

News organizations can also be affected by the regulations, and are concerned about restrictions on information important to the public. If, for example, victims of disasters, accidents or crimes are taken to a hospital, officials might not release any information without patients' consent, making it nearly impossible to learn the names and conditions of the injured.

Those regulated by the rule are leaving nothing to chance.

"The preparation was massive - massive and all-consuming," said Kathryn Bakich, vice president-national director for health care compliance at The Segal Co., a benefits consulting firm.

"People are getting hysterical. There is a lot of wiggle room in the regulations, so people have to decide what is a reasonable effort at compliance and what is not."

Penalties for privacy violations range from a $100 fine to up to a $250,000 fine and 10 years in prison. The most severe punishment is reserved for people who intended to sell medical information for personal or financial gain or to harm the patient.

So far, patients have had little reaction. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston provided patients with a phone number to call if they had HIPAA questions, but many of the calls have been to check on doctor's appointments.

When Robin Ruffner went into a Manhattan hospital last week for plastic surgery, she was irritated at having to sign a form when she was jittery about the procedure.

"I was really nervous and didn't feel like reading a form. I think it would have been better if they gave me them a week before when I wasn't nervous," the 31-year old social worker said.

Ruffner also signed a HIPAA release form at a visit to the allergist earlier this month. But overall, Ruffner said, she doesn't mind signing the forms because she thinks laws to protect patients' medical records are a good idea.

The medical community has spent vast amounts - http://thesaurus.com/browse/amounts to show patients and the government it is serious protecting medical records. The University of Texas at Galveston has spent about $1.5 million, not counting all the personnel time, on compliance. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates compliance will cost the industry $17.6 billion over 10 years.

Some observers worry that these costs will trickle down to consumers, but HHS spokesman Pierce said efficiencies from electronic transfer of records will save nearly $30 billion over the same time. One of HIPAA's mandates is to standardize the electronic transfer of patient records, but this part of the regulations does not go into full effect until Oct. 16.

Bakich said health insurers are telling clients administrative costs will rise because of updating systems to comply with the regulations, which in turn could increase premiums.

"This comes at a bad time because health care costs were going up anyway," Bakich said.

Despite the legions of businesses offering HIPAA advice, health executives say one of the challenging aspects of compliance is deciphering the rules and figuring out what is necessary to comply.

"People would go to one conference and hear one thing and someone else would go to another conference and hear something else," said Shelley Witter, manager of information systems at Galveston.

Galveston had to update its computer system so it could make a list of patients who had to be informed of the regulations and track them as they were. It also had to record who might have received information without the patient's consent, which is allowed in certain circumstances such as reporting suspected child abuse.

Another delicate issue has been implementing the regulations without negatively affecting communication between hospitals and doctors and their patients and patients' families and loved ones.

Pierce said hospitals and doctors use their judgment about which family members and friends should receive a patient's medical information. But now many doctors and hospitals are asking patients to put it in writing.

Some units at MCG hospital in Augusta, Ga., have patients create a password given to those authorized to speak with the medical staff.

"This way people can get updates," Regina Maier, of the MCG Health System. "The communication issue becomes harder when so many people live far from family and friends."

Meanwhile, journalists are still grappling with the laws. In small towns, printing the names of people who went into the hospital or nursing home was common and advocates say such practices unified a community.

"This regulation imposes big city values on us (small papers)," said Tonda Rush, counsel to the National Newspaper Association, a trade group for small papers.

Rush also fears the new regulations will silence potential whistle blowers from speaking to journalists because their actions could be considered HIPAA violations.

"The confusions and doubts about the law could keep people quiet," Rush said.

By Theresa Agovino

agency said

The revisions are based on data from Canada, China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Vietnam, the U.N. agency said. Until now the agency had put the rate at 6-10 percent, although a study earlier this week of patients in Hong Kong said the death rate was around 20 percent.

"The likelihood of dying from SARS in a given area has been shown to depend on the profile of the cases, including the age group most affected and the presence of underlying disease," the health agency said in a statement on its Web site.

WHO also Thursday extended its SARS warning on travel to Taiwan and to two more regions of China.

People planning travel to Taiwan, Tianjin or Inner Mongolia should "consider postponing all but essential travel," said a statement by the U.N. agency.

WHO communicable diseases chief Dr. David Heymann said there were outbreaks of the respiratory disease - http://imgur.com/hot?q=respiratory%20disease in those regions, "and we are not able to do the assessments to ensure these areas are safe."

The organization has already issued travel warnings for Hong Kong, Beijing and China's Guangdong and Shanxi provinces.

The death rate from the disease is below 1 percent for people aged 24 or younger, rising to 6 percent for those aged 25 to 44, 15 percent in those aged 45 to 64 and more than 50 percent for those aged over 65.

WHO said studying only those cases where the patient has died or made a full recovery could skew the figures while the outbreak is still continuing because the average time from illness to death is shorter than the average time from illness to recovery.

Its method takes account of the length of time for which patients have survived — looking at the risk of dying in the first week of illness, the risk in the second week, and so on. WHO said this gave a death rate of 14 percent in Singapore and 15 percent in Hong Kong.

In Vietnam, where the outbreak is apparently under control, the death rate was 8 percent. "One explanation for this is the large number of total cases that occurred in younger, previously healthy health care workers," WHO said.

There has been debate for https://www.3dspace.kr/ - https://www.3dspace.kr/ weeks about the true death rate for SARS. It has risen from below 5 percent in the weeks that SARS was first spreading around the globe to a level as high as 15 percent in Canada.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention so far puts the death rate at 6.6 percent.

WHO said the figures only cover those who were sick enough to be admitted to hospitals, not those who recovered at home or who had no symptoms, said WHO communicable diseases expert Dr. Nigel Gay.

"It depends on what you define SARS to be. This is 'severe' acute respiratory syndrome. It's not a case fatality rate for coronavirus infection," he said.

WHO said it also has reviewed the incubation period — the time from exposure to the onset of disease — and continues to conclude that the maximum period is 10 days.

"The incubation period can vary from one case to another according to the route by which the person was exposed, the dose of virus received and other factors including immune status," WHO said.

It said it based its findings on cases in Singapore, Canada and Europe because patients in badly hit areas like Hong Kong and China could have been exposed to the virus on multiple occasions, making it impossible to establish the incubation period.

The study in Hong Kong said that the incubation period - http://rt.com/search/everywhere/term/incubation%20period/ could be as long as 14 days. WHO said it would be looking at that in more detail.

If the incubation period is truly longer than 10 days, people who are being quarantined because they have been in close contact with a SARS patient may not be in isolation long enough.

Worldwide, at least 507 people have died from SARS, and more than 7,000 infected.

Meanwhile, China's anti-SARS team has a new member -- NBA star Yao Ming.

The Houston Rockets center plans to host a telethon Sunday in his hometown of Shanghai to raise money for SARS research. His agent, Eric Zhang, says the Shanghai branch of the Chinese Red Cross will accept donations from callers.

Other NBA stars, as well as Chinese soccer and film stars, plan to make videotaped appearances.

The Houston Chronicle reports NBA players Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, Tim Duncan and Tracy McGrady are sending videotaped messages.

But it's a response not seen with standard chemotherapy for this cancer, "so this was impressive," said Dr

Scientists hope Velcade, or similar drugs, could one day become effective for other cancers.

The drug is the first anticancer proteasome - http://www.squidoo.com/search/results?q=anticancer%20proteasome inhibitor, meaning it targets an enzyme key to cell growth. Uncontrolled cell growth is cancer's hallmark. The idea: Inhibit proteasome action, and chemicals that control cell growth should be disrupted enough for cancer cells to die.

Velcade maker Millennium Pharmaceuticals first tried the approach to treat multiple myeloma, a usually fatal blood cancer that strikes 14,600 Americans a year. The condition is treatable but incurable, and patients eventually run out of options. Half die within five years of diagnosis.

Velcade isn't a cure either, but studies suggest it can help a fraction of patients who have exhausted other alternatives, the Food and Drug Administration ruled late Tuesday.

The FDA approved Velcade's sale less than four months after Millennium filed its application, under a special program that lets promising drugs for life-threatening illnesses sell before there's final proof of how well they work.

Millennium gave Velcade injections to 188 patients who had relapsed despite about six prior therapies. Some 28 percent improved, and that improvement lasted a median of one year — a surprising length of time for people so sick, the FDA said.

The FDA is requiring Cambridge, Mass.-based Millennium to do further research to prove if that response actually translates into living longer.

But it's a response not seen with standard chemotherapy for this cancer, "so this was impressive," said Dr. Ann Farrell, who led FDA's review.

Evidence so far suggests "this represents a true advance over existing therapies," added FDA oncology chief Dr. Richard Pazdur.

Normal cells contain proteasome, too, making them vulnerable to the drug. Side effects include many typical of chemotherapy: nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, headache, decreased appetite, decreased blood cell production, and a nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy.

Still, for some unknown reason, Velcade, known chemically as bortezomib, appeared more likely to select myeloma cells, Farrell said.

Millennium plans to begin shipping Velcade by month's end. It will cost about $20,000 per average course of treatment — 16 to 17 weeks — which is comparable to other injected cancer therapies, https://www.hfoxhz55t.online - https://www.hfoxhz55t.online according to Barry Greene, the company's general manager in charge of oncology.

Millennium is studying whether Velcade also could treat advanced colon and lung cancer.

agency said

The revisions are based on data from Canada, China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Vietnam, the U.N. agency said. Until now the agency had put the rate at 6-10 percent, although a study earlier this week of patients in Hong Kong said the death rate was around 20 percent.

"The likelihood of dying from SARS in a given area has been shown to depend on the profile of the cases, including the age group most affected and the presence of underlying disease," the health agency said in a statement on its Web site.

WHO also Thursday extended its SARS warning on travel to Taiwan and to two more regions of China.

People planning travel to Taiwan, Tianjin or Inner Mongolia should "consider postponing all but essential travel," said a statement by the U.N. agency.

WHO communicable diseases chief Dr. David Heymann - http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/David%20Heymann?s=ts said there were outbreaks of the respiratory disease in those regions, "and we are not able to do the assessments to ensure these areas are safe."

The organization has already issued travel warnings for Hong Kong, Beijing and China's Guangdong and Shanxi provinces.

The death rate from the disease is below 1 percent for people aged 24 or younger, rising to 6 percent for those aged 25 to 44, 15 percent in those aged 45 to 64 and more than 50 percent for those aged over 65.

WHO said studying only those cases where the patient has died or made a full recovery could skew the figures while the outbreak is still continuing because the average time from illness to death is shorter than the average time from illness to recovery.

Its method takes account of the length of time for which patients have survived — looking at the risk of dying in the first week of illness, the risk in the second week, and so on. WHO said this gave a death rate of 14 percent in Singapore and 15 percent in Hong Kong.

In Vietnam, where the outbreak is apparently under control, the death rate was 8 percent. "One explanation for this is the large number of total cases that occurred in younger, previously healthy health care workers," WHO said.

There has been debate for weeks about the true death rate for SARS. It has risen from below 5 percent in the weeks that SARS was first spreading around the globe to a level as high as 15 percent in Canada.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention so far puts the death rate at 6.6 percent.

WHO said the figures only cover those who were sick enough to be admitted to hospitals, not those who recovered at home or who had no symptoms, said WHO communicable diseases expert Dr. Nigel Gay.

"It depends on what you define SARS to be. This is 'severe' acute respiratory syndrome. It's not a case fatality rate for coronavirus infection," he said.

WHO said it also has reviewed the incubation period — the time from exposure to the onset of disease — and continues to conclude that the maximum period is 10 days.

"The incubation period can vary from one case to another according to the route by which the person was exposed, the dose of virus received and other factors including immune status," WHO said.

It said it based its findings on cases in Singapore, Canada and Europe because patients in badly hit areas like Hong Kong and China could have been exposed to the virus on multiple occasions, making it impossible to establish the incubation period.

The study in Hong Kong said that the incubation period could be as long as 14 days. WHO said it would be looking at that in more detail.

If the incubation period is truly longer than 10 days, people who are being quarantined because they have been in close contact with a SARS patient may not be in isolation long enough.

Worldwide, at least 507 people have died from SARS, and more than 7,000 infected.

Meanwhile, https://www.dmzdxe4oo.online - https://www.dmzdxe4oo.online China's anti-SARS team has a new member -- NBA star Yao Ming.

The Houston Rockets center plans to host a telethon Sunday in his hometown of Shanghai to raise money for SARS research. His agent, Eric Zhang, says the Shanghai branch of the Chinese Red Cross will accept donations from callers.

Other NBA stars, as well as Chinese soccer and film stars, plan to make videotaped appearances.

The Houston Chronicle reports NBA players Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, Tim Duncan and Tracy McGrady are sending videotaped messages.

Millennium is studying whether Velcade also could treat advanced colon and lung cancer

Scientists hope Velcade, or similar drugs, could one day become effective for other cancers.

The drug is the first anticancer proteasome inhibitor, meaning it targets an enzyme key to cell growth. Uncontrolled cell growth is cancer's hallmark. The idea: Inhibit proteasome action, and chemicals that control cell growth should be disrupted enough for cancer cells to die.

Velcade maker Millennium Pharmaceuticals first tried the approach to treat multiple myeloma, a usually fatal blood cancer that strikes 14,600 Americans a year. The condition is treatable but incurable, and patients eventually run out of options. Half die within five years of diagnosis.

Velcade isn't a cure either, but studies suggest it can help a fraction of patients who have exhausted other alternatives, the Food and Drug Administration ruled late Tuesday.

The FDA approved Velcade's sale less than four months after Millennium filed its application, under a special program that lets promising drugs for life-threatening illnesses - http://rt.com/search/everywhere/term/life-threatening%20illnesses/ sell before there's final proof of how well they work.

Millennium gave Velcade injections to 188 patients who had relapsed despite about six prior therapies. Some 28 percent improved, and that improvement lasted a median of one year — a surprising length of time for people so sick, the FDA said.

The FDA is requiring Cambridge, 바카라사이트 - http://www.supersteeltreating.com/coat.html Mass.-based Millennium to do further research to prove if that response actually translates into living longer.

But it's a response not seen with standard chemotherapy for this cancer, "so this was impressive," said Dr. Ann Farrell, who led FDA's review.

Evidence so far suggests "this represents a true advance over existing therapies," added FDA oncology chief Dr. Richard Pazdur.

Normal cells contain proteasome, too, making them vulnerable to the drug. Side effects include many typical of chemotherapy: nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, headache, decreased appetite, decreased blood cell production, and a nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy.

Still, for some unknown reason, Velcade, known chemically as bortezomib, appeared more likely to select myeloma cells, Farrell said.

Millennium plans to begin shipping Velcade by month's end. It will cost about $20,000 per average course of treatment — 16 to 17 weeks — which is comparable to other injected cancer therapies, according to Barry Greene, the company's general manager in charge of oncology.

Millennium is studying whether Velcade also could treat advanced colon and lung cancer.

Abdullah charged that outgoing President Hamid Karzai, Ahmadzai and the election commission were colluding against him

KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghan presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah defiantly told thousands of supporters Tuesday that he will declare victory in the country's election, claiming massive fraud was responsible for preliminary - http://www.reddit.com/r/howto/search?q=preliminary results that put his rival in the lead. The United States warned both camps against trying to seize power, saying international financial and 김제출장마사지 - https://www.gimjemassage.club/ security support was at stake.

The turmoil came as violence escalated around the country. A suicide bomber struck Afghan and foreign forces near a clinic in the eastern province of Parwan, killing at least 16 people, including four Czech soldiers.

Abdullah said he received calls from President Barack Obama and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, and he was told that Kerry would be flying to the Afghan capital on Friday in a bid to help defuse the crisis. State Department officials accompanying Kerry in Beijing declined to comment on his travel plans.

Abdullah told his supporters that the results of the election were fraudulent, but asked them to give him a few more days to negotiate.

"We denounce and do not accept the results of the fraudulent vote. I assure you people of Afghanistan that I will sacrifice for you, but I will never accept a fraudulent government," he told his supporters, many angry over the result. "We announce that only the government elected through clean votes will come to power."

The Afghan Independent Election Commission on Monday released preliminary results from the June 14 runoff showing former finance minister - http://www.zixiutangpollencapsules.com/?s=finance%20minister Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai well in the lead for the presidency but said no winner could be declared because millions of ballots were being audited for fraud.

According to the preliminary results, Ahmadzai had about 4.5 million votes, or 56 percent, while Abdullah had 3.5 million votes, or 44 percent. Turnout was more than 50 percent.

That was a sharp turnaround from the first round of voting on April 5 when Abdullah garnered the most votes with 46 percent to Ahmadzai's 31.6 percent but failed to get the majority needed to avoid a runoff vote.

Abdullah has refused to accept any results from the second round until all fraudulent ballots are invalidated.

Ahmadzai, a U.S.-educated former finance minister and World Bank official, said he also had spoken to Kerry on the telephone.

"We welcome him (Kerry) coming here, but the real responsibility is up to us and we are hopeful that we will fulfill all our responsibilities," he said at a news conference at his home in Kabul. "We are prepared to engage in political discussion in order to make sure that we move to insure the legitimacy of the process, its fairness and the acceptance of its results."

He also rejected the idea of parallel governments, which has been raised by some Abdullah supporters.

"Talk of parallel governments will remain in the level of talk, because the historic responsibility that his excellency Dr. Abdullah and I as people who have submitted ourselves to the will of the people of Afghanistan have is to ensure the stability of this country and the legitimacy of the regime to which we have devoted our lives."

The election commission acknowledged that vote rigging had occurred and said ballots from about 7,000 more of the nearly 23,000 polling stations would be audited.

Abdullah charged that outgoing President Hamid Karzai, Ahmadzai and the election commission were colluding against him. "They ignored us and announced the fraudulent results," he said.

"People across the county have called on us to announce our government and I cannot say no to the people's wish," he said. "All of our lives we defended this country. We do not want crisis, we want national unity."

"We are the winner of the election without any doubt," he said.

Kerry said during a visit to Tokyo that any action to seize power illegally in Afghanistan would lead to the end of U.S. financial and security support.

Kerry said suggestions of a "parallel government" in Afghanistan were a grave concern and added that he expected Afghan electoral institutions to conduct a full review of all reasonable allegations of irregularities. He said there was no justification for violence or threats of illegal action.

"Any action to take power by extra-legal means will cost Afghanistan the financial and security support of the United States and the international community," Kerry said.

Abdullah said Obama had called him to promise help "in cleaning up votes."

The European Union and the U.N. urged the IEC and its sister complaints commission to cooperate on the audits.

The U.N. mission in Afghanistan also called on both candidates "to exercise restraint and take all steps necessary to control their supporters to prevent them from making irresponsible statements and from taking steps that could lead to civil disorder and instability."

Meanwhile, the Czech Ministry of Defense confirmed that four Czech troops were killed and another was badly wounded by Tuesday's blast.

At least 10 civilians and two police officers also were killed in the attack near the provincial capital of Charakar, local government spokesman Wahid Sediqqi said.

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement sent to the media.

Research shows that most of the radiation passes through without being absorbed

The federal program feeds 28 million low-income school children every day, but not all of them will be eating irradiated meat. Schools will not be required to put it on the menu, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. Still, the government must have it on hand for those that want it.

The agency will soon begin accepting bids from companies that want to supply the federal lunch program, the official said.

Congress last year ordered the department to start accepting irradiation as a method of sanitizing meat for the national school lunch program. The department itself deemed the technology safe in 1999 after concluding that its benefits — preventing food poisoning — outweighed the risk of any potential side effects.

Irradiation involves directing gamma rays produced by the radioactive material, cobalt 60, or electricity at meat to kill harmful bacteria. Research shows that most of the radiation passes through without being absorbed. The small amount that does remain kills the bacteria.

Thousands of parents and consumer advocates have protested the decision to allow schools to buy the sanitized meat for meals, expressing fears that too little is known about the long-term effects - http://www.thefreedictionary.com/long-term%20effects of continuous consumption of the product.

The consumer group Public Citizen argues irradiation could cause cancer, but studies have shown that irradiated food is safe.

Many doctors and scientists strongly support the department's decision to put the special meat in the lunch program, say irradiation is effective in preventing deadly cases of food poisoning.

More than 5,000 people die each year from foodborne illness, 마산출장안마 - https://www.masanopmassage.club/ according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children, the elderly and people with weak immune systems are especially vulnerable.

In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration deemed irradiation as a safe method of killing off bacteria that can cause food poisoning.

runs along a 930-yard course from a holding pen to Pamplona's bull ring

PAMPLONA, Spain - Three people were injured, one seriously, as thousands of daredevils raced alongside six fighting bulls in the second running of the bulls at Spain's world-famous San Fermin festival Tuesday.

No one was gored but a Navarra regional government statement said a 23-year-old man from Nottingham, England, 용인출장만남 - https://www.yonginopmassage.club/ was in serious condition with chest injuries and rib fractures sustained during the frenzied dash through the narrow winding streets of this northern city. He was identified only by his initials, T. H.

The government said a Japanese man and a Spaniard were also treated in hospital for light injuries - http://www.stockhouse.com/search?searchtext=light%20injuries .

One person was gored in the opening run Monday.

Dozens of people are injured each year in the 8 a.m. runs along a 930-yard course from a holding pen to Pamplona's bull ring. Most are hurt in falls.

Fifteen people have died from gorings since record-keeping began in 1924.

The nine-day street-partying festival was immortalized in Ernest Hemingway's 1926 novel "The Sun Also Rises" and attracts thousands of foreign tourists.

Turnout was more than 50 percent

KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghan presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah defiantly told thousands of supporters Tuesday that he will declare victory in the country's election, claiming massive fraud was responsible for preliminary results that put his rival in the lead. The United States warned both camps against trying to seize power, saying international financial and security support was at stake.

The turmoil came as violence escalated around the country. A suicide bomber struck Afghan and foreign forces near a clinic in the eastern province of Parwan, killing at least 16 people, including four Czech soldiers.

Abdullah said he received calls from President Barack Obama and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, and he was told that Kerry would be flying to the Afghan capital on Friday in a bid to help defuse the crisis. State Department officials accompanying Kerry in Beijing declined to comment on his travel plans.

Abdullah told his supporters that the results of the election - http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/election were fraudulent, but asked them to give him a few more days to negotiate.

"We denounce and do not accept the results of the fraudulent vote. I assure you people of Afghanistan that I will sacrifice for you, but I will never accept a fraudulent government," he told his supporters, many angry over the result. "We announce that only the government elected through clean votes will come to power."

The Afghan Independent Election Commission on Monday released preliminary results from the June 14 runoff showing former finance minister Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai well in the lead for the presidency but said no winner could be declared because millions of ballots were being audited for fraud.

According to the preliminary results, Ahmadzai had about 4.5 million votes, or 56 percent, while Abdullah had 3.5 million votes, or 경산출장마사지 - https://www.anmastar.com/%ea%b2%bd%ec%82%b0%ec%b6%9c%ec%9e%a5%ec%83%b5%c... 44 percent. Turnout was more than 50 percent.

That was a sharp turnaround from the first round of voting on April 5 when Abdullah garnered the most votes with 46 percent to Ahmadzai's 31.6 percent but failed to get the majority needed to avoid a runoff vote.

Abdullah has refused to accept any results from the second round until all fraudulent ballots are invalidated.

Ahmadzai, a U.S.-educated former finance minister - http://imageshack.us/photos/finance%20minister and World Bank official, said he also had spoken to Kerry on the telephone.

"We welcome him (Kerry) coming here, but the real responsibility is up to us and we are hopeful that we will fulfill all our responsibilities," he said at a news conference at his home in Kabul. "We are prepared to engage in political discussion in order to make sure that we move to insure the legitimacy of the process, its fairness and the acceptance of its results."

He also rejected the idea of parallel governments, which has been raised by some Abdullah supporters.

"Talk of parallel governments will remain in the level of talk, because the historic responsibility that his excellency Dr. Abdullah and I as people who have submitted ourselves to the will of the people of Afghanistan have is to ensure the stability of this country and the legitimacy of the regime to which we have devoted our lives."

The election commission acknowledged that vote rigging had occurred and said ballots from about 7,000 more of the nearly 23,000 polling stations would be audited.

Abdullah charged that outgoing President Hamid Karzai, Ahmadzai and the election commission were colluding against him. "They ignored us and announced the fraudulent results," he said.

"People across the county have called on us to announce our government and I cannot say no to the people's wish," he said. "All of our lives we defended this country. We do not want crisis, we want national unity."

"We are the winner of the election without any doubt," he said.

Kerry said during a visit to Tokyo that any action to seize power illegally in Afghanistan would lead to the end of U.S. financial and security support.

Kerry said suggestions of a "parallel government" in Afghanistan were a grave concern and added that he expected Afghan electoral institutions to conduct a full review of all reasonable allegations of irregularities. He said there was no justification for violence or threats of illegal action.

"Any action to take power by extra-legal means will cost Afghanistan the financial and security support of the United States and the international community," Kerry said.

Abdullah said Obama had called him to promise help "in cleaning up votes."

The European Union and the U.N. urged the IEC and its sister complaints commission to cooperate on the audits.

The U.N. mission in Afghanistan also called on both candidates "to exercise restraint and take all steps necessary to control their supporters to prevent them from making irresponsible statements and from taking steps that could lead to civil disorder and instability."

Meanwhile, the Czech Ministry of Defense confirmed that four Czech troops were killed and another was badly wounded by Tuesday's blast.

At least 10 civilians and two police officers also were killed in the attack near the provincial capital of Charakar, local government spokesman Wahid Sediqqi said.

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement sent to the media.

You've got to understand, I have absolute confidence in the way that ..

Brandon Hantz was sent home from Wednesday night's "Survivor: Caramoan" in perhaps the most dramatic exit ever -- at an Immunity Challenge that morphed into a Tribal Council when his tribe forfeited following Brandon's camp-wide rampage that culminated with him dumping their stock of rice and beans into the sand.

ETonline interviewed the 21-year-old chemical disposal worker from Katy, Texas, the day after his ouster aired. Read on for the rambling Q&A that touches on everything from whether he regrets dumping the rice and beans (Hint: not at all), to the shoulder massage host Jeff Probst gave him at the Immunity Challenge, to being forgiven - http://www.houzz.com/?search=forgiven for his sins, and to his dream of coming back to the show to compete with his infamous uncle Russell Hantz. All with pop culture references to YouTube bullies, a popular video game, and Justin Timberlake thrown in.

ETonline: You and Phillip had been going back and forth for awhile, what was it about the interaction with him that pushed you over the edge?

Brandon Hantz: Very demeaning, very disrespectful, very just like "Daddy-ish," he wanted to play God and dad and everything else. ... He was the leader in some weird, weird, weird way. Sick, if you ask me. He's a silly guy ... It's entertaining, to see him be weird.

ETonline: So, even in the beginning of the episode, you mentioned that you had thought about spoiling the rice and beans if you were going to end up going home, and then you ended up spilling the rice and beans, what was your thought when you did that?

Hantz: My thought was, if they take a million dollars from me, I'm gonna take two days worth of rice, I mean, come on. I think it's a fair trade. I think I got the dirty end of the stick, but it was hilarious, was it not?

ETonline: It was entertaining, it's true. But I guess I'm wondering, on the episode we see you clashing with Phillip a lot, but it seemed like you were getting along pretty well with everyone else.

Hantz: Yeah, I was. ... It was kind of disheartening, to see my friends down talk me like I'm supposed to be in a hospital. Everybody had to live with Phillip too and everybody was just as disgusted. They were just bitter that they didn't have any rice and beans, and they wanted to trash me. The people that wanted to play to the cameras are Andrea, Malcolm, Corinne, Phillip and Cochrane for that matter. Ugh. He does nothing. ... I have no problem with these guys in real life, but, dude, as far as I'm concerned, man, those people aren't real reality TV. ...

When you're behind those cameras, there's so many fake people that just like to play up to the cameras -- bandwagon-hoppers, is what I call them. They like to jump on whatever's good, you know? ... If I would have been in the alliance with Phillip, they wouldn't have talked to me the way that they did. It would've been okay to vote off Phillip. But as Corinne said in the last scenes for the next episode, she said he's the craziest person, or she said, he's the most annoying person to ever play "Survivor." And that was what I was trying to portray. But when I approached everyone, it was like, 'Oh, let's ignore him,' so we'll see how it works out for Corinne. So, I mean, you should've listened when you had the chance. Now, you may be voted out. You never know.

ETonline: When you say that they were playing - http://www.exeideas.com/?s=playing to the camera, what did you see being there, that we didn't see at home?

Hantz: I saw a bunch of people that were being really nice. I mean, we all got along really well, we played games. That's why Andrea was crying, because she was like, "Wow, I really screwed this guy." ... I really liked my tribe. I did not like the fact that they were being manipulated by Phillip, or really, just going along with him. You don't go along with somebody like that, you cut the head off the snake, like I say, or you end up getting screwed yourself. ... I see a bunch of followers out there and I'm a leader. That's what I do -- I lead stuff. And I make stuff happen and pour rice and beans out and whatnot.

ETonline: So, speaking of the rice and beans, do you regret that, or do you stand by that decision?

Hantz: I definitely stand by that decision. It was awesome. Did you not see their faces? [Laughing] It was epic! It was almost as cool as [video game] Modern Warfare 3. I'm just saying.

ETonline: Did you feel guilty at all, because maybe they might go hungry for a couple days?

Hantz: That's okay. It's "Survivor."

ETonline: Talking about the Immunity Challenge -- were you surprised that Jeff started the Tribal Council right there at the immunity challenge?

Hantz: [Laughing] It was awesome. The whole episode was amazing. You've got to understand, I have absolute confidence in the way that ... maybe because I was being picked on so much? For example, have you watched [the] YouTube [video] where the fat kid was getting picked on by the little bitty skinny kid and finally the fat kid just straight up power bombs him on the concrete? It was awesome, and everybody was cheering for that little guy. Why? Because he's been slapped and punched and kicked and finally he takes up for himself. Do you think he regrets it? Hell no. That little kid's like, I'm about to go eat me some donuts and play me some Modern Warfare 3. And that's exactly what he did. How do you regret something like that?

Aside from [that] I love Jesus, I love my faith, I'm a Christian, you know, and I know it gets tired, people hearing all about it, but still, I'm not gonna change my beliefs just because I didn't represent the way I was supposed to. I'm not perfect, like I said the last season, but at the same time, I would say conviction did set in for me, you know. ... It's important to me to do the right thing, at all times, but I can say that I'm forgiven for it, so I don't really have any problem with what happened. It was a year ago. Would I do it again? No. Of course not. Okay I can't say that I wouldn't do it again. [Laughing] I don't know really what I would do, but obviously I would try my best for it not to get to that point, for me having to spill rice and beans to prove a point.

But all I was doing was proving a point ... [that] you can't always get to eat. You can't just make somebody feel like garbage and then just not have consequences for it. And it's such a little consequence, I mean, come on, you're on Survivor, we're starving already, go fish for something. I was cooking everything, I was picking up around the shelter. You're taking my chance of winning a million dollars, you're taking my money away from me and my family, so, rice and beans? Cry me a river. Cry me a river, like Justin Timberlake said. You know what I'm saying?

ETonline: [At the Immunity Challenge] Jeff was kind of holding you, Jeff separated you from the tribe...

Hantz: Oh, Jeff has the softest hands ever. It is amazing. Jeff, I'm down for another massage if that is cool with you. Just fly me in, real quick shoulder, maybe a foot, because I'd like to see how them soft hands would do on my feet. Jeff's awesome, man, I respect him. ... And any [members of the] production [team], man. I've never given production trouble, one time, one time. ... And they all respect me as a person, maybe not as a player. I'm not a very good player. I'm good at being myself and I'm good at challenges, but as far as "Survivor" strategy is concerned, I'm in the low, low averages, I would say. But I definitely respect Jeff, and if he asked anything of me, as I was out there or even in life, if he needed a favor, if he needed help, I would be there for him. The guy is not just a host, a great host, he's a good person. And that's hard to come by, because some of these guys think they're too sexy for their shucks sort of thing, and he's a real person, for sure, and I respect him a lot.

ETonline: If he hadn't separated you, do you think you would have gotten physical with Phillip?

Hantz: I think it could've got there, of course. I can't lie and say that wasn't a possibility, but I think even in the midst of my anger, I did have control. As you've seen, I showed a lot of restraint. A lot of restraint. The only thing that really could've ended up bad for him was if he would've approached me. And kept talking about my family. But, you know, he's not stupid like that.

I know he's a pretty ignorant guy sometimes, "Survivor"-wise now, this isn't in real life, but as far as "Survivor," very, very ignorant. But as far as, you know, life is concerned, 김천출장마사지 - https://www.gimcheonsoftmassage.club/ I can't make that call. I respect the guy, and I'd have no problem shaking his hand and being friends with him. Now would he do that with me? Doubtful. 'Cause, you know, not everybody's forgiving and forgetful, but I would hope.

ETonline: Watching you on two seasons of "Survivor," and seeing your uncle on two seasons of "Survivor," you both talk about the Hantz family name a lot.

Hantz: Very prideful. Very prideful family.

ETonline: Does your family put a lot of pressure on you to be a certain way?

Hantz: No, no, the pressure's there, for everyone. It's a lot of pressure for everybody. I can't just put it on me. It's kind of a selfish thing for me to do. We're a very, very prideful family. We have the biggest hearts in the world, but you cross us and it's not a good thing. That doesn't mean physical, but if we don't tear you down verbally and intellectually - 'cause most people think these guys are stupid, you know, trailer trash. A lot of that -- trailer trash country boys that just have a temper. You have no idea of the intellectual capacity we have. ... There's a lot of pride, there's a lot of defensiveness we have towards people because of the stereotype they put us under. And that's even before "Survivor," we can't blame that on "Survivor." ... We really love and respect our family and our friends, and we're very, very loyal and we'll help you out in any way, shape or form.

ETonline: What is your relationship with your uncle Russell like right now?

Hantz: Awesome. He's never been more prouder of me. ... We had a bad season to where we really didn't like each other. I mean, it was legitimate -- he wanted to make my life hell, I wanted to make his life hell. But there's always been a physical respect and nothing ever gets physical, because it's just not like that. We don't always resort to that kind of stuff, we very rarely resort to that actually. ... we just came to a conclusion that look -- we may not agree on everything, but we are family. And we're gonna have to live with each other and if anything were to happen to my Uncle Russell, I'd be devastated. So I texted him, and I told him, I love you Uncle Russell and I hope everything goes good for you. We're so much the same. When two people are so much alike, there's always going to be confrontation. Always.

And we both really want to compete against each other. ... That would be such an honor and a privilege to play ["Survivor"] with my uncle, my own family, that would do so much for the Hantz name. And on top of that, [I] would be so paranoid. And [when] the paranoia sets in - it makes even better TV, in my opinion, [since] I don't know if I can trust him on "Survivor." The dynamic between us -- I can see a lot of confrontation. At the same time, we would have each other there. There could possibly be an alliance there. ... But there's also a good possibility that we could be gunning for each other, so I'm actually excited to see if that's even a possibility. Plus, I hold the record for the most weight held, with Jim Rice, and really I held it like 30 seconds longer than he did, so I hold the record, just sayin'. And [Russell] swears that he can beat me. I'm like, okay old man, so let's keep dreaming. I'm the new Hantz, and the new one's always better than the old.

Survivor airs Wednesday night at 8 p.m. on CBS.

Mexico's Defense Department says soldiers were patrolling in one of the most violent, lawless corners of the country on June 30 when they came under fire from a warehouse where a gang of 21 men and one woman were hiding

SAN PEDRO LIMON, Mexico - Bullet marks and blood spatters on the walls inside a grain storage warehouse deep in the mountains of southern Mexico tell a grim story of death involving soldiers and alleged criminals. It may not be the same story officials tell, however.

Mexico's Defense Department says soldiers were patrolling in one of the most violent, lawless corners of the country on June 30 when they came under fire from a warehouse where a gang of 21 men and one woman were hiding. One soldier was wounded, but all of the suspects were killed.

The shootout was the most dramatic in a string of battles in which the army says criminals fired first at soldiers who then killed them all, while suffering few or no losses. There have been so many such incidents that human rights groups and analysts have begun to doubt the military's version.

"It raises suspicion, the simple fact that there were 22 dead on one side and one wounded on the other side," said security analyst Alejandro Hope, a former official in Mexico's domestic intelligence service.

In San Pedro Limon, pools of blood and bullet marks observed by Associated Press journalists three days after the shooting raise questions about whether all the suspects died in the gunbattle, or after it was over. The warehouse where many bodies were found showed little evidence of sustained fighting.

One witness who lives near the warehouse said he heard almost two hours of automatic gunfire and loud bangs during the pre-dawn hours of June 30. But he couldn't say if it came from the warehouse or from the forested hillsides around it. The man, who did not want to be identified for fear of reprisals, said he saw soldiers searching the hillsides after the shooting stopped.

Despite that heavy gunfire, only about six incoming rounds appeared to have hit the facade of the warehouse, the only part of the building with a window or door where soldiers likely would have been firing at people holed up inside.

There also were also no signs of continuous shooting inside the building, few bullet marks and no casings - https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&tbm=nws&q=casings . But there was ample evidence of death. The floor was stained with pools of drying blood and scattered with pieces of numbered paper left by investigators to mark where cadavers were found.

At least five spots along the warehouse's inside walls showed the same pattern: One or two closely placed bullet pocks, surrounded by a mass of spattered blood, giving the appearance that some of those killed were standing against the wall and were hit by one or two shots at about chest level.

The distance - http://www.superghostblogger.com/?s=distance at which the fatal shots were fired has not made public by the Mexico State prosecutor's office, which is carrying out the autopsies. A state official said the office could not release the cause of death because it is a federal case, but a federal official denied that. Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak on the record.

The Mexican Defense Department did not respond to requests for comment.

Two observers of the United Nations' High Commission on Human Rights, who inspected the warehouse just moments before state authorities closed it off with police "no entry" tape, noted that they found no signs of stray bullets of the type that would be left by soldiers shooting automatic weapons from a distance.

Nor did they see signs of outgoing fire from within the warehouse.

"I also find that remarkable," said U.N. observer Tom Haeck, adding that no conclusions had yet been drawn, and that any report would be for U.N. internal use.

Scattered around the earthen floor of the warehouse were notebook paper investigators left to mark where the bodies had been found; most were close to the walls. There were also toothbrushes, medications and empty food containers, suggesting people had camped out there.

Employees of the Mexico State medical examiners' office, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the press, said the dead were mostly youths between the ages of 16 and 24, and were from neighboring Guerrero state. It's home to a drug gang known as Guerreros Unidos, which reportedly is battling the Michoacan-state-based La Familia cartel for control of drug routes in the area. Officials have declined to say which gang might have been involved with the warehouse.

The Mexican army's rules of engagement allow soldiers to fire on armed civilians only if the civilians fire first. In some cases there is evidence that heavily armed drug gangs have attacked the military. A convoy of troops and 해남출장업소 - https://www.haenamsoftmassage.club/ police came under fire on May 16 in Michoacan state; four soldiers were killed and several wounded. The military said two soldiers died in another Michoacan ambush in January. Five soldiers died in a 2007 ambush in the same state.

But far more common of late are cases in which soldiers say they came under fire and only the attackers were killed.

The army reported a May 8 clash in Zacatecas state in which troops killed seven armed men without taking casualties. In four cases in the span of a week in late April, officials said federal forces killed 12 men who attacked them, but suffered no casualties themselves. The army said troops killed 11 other alleged hit men who fired on them in the northern border state of Tamaulipas in 2010.

Hope, the security analyst, said he certainly doesn't want any more dead among the military. But in the case of San Pedro Limon, "it is important for there to be a thorough investigation, to dispel doubts or punish anyone who should be punished. I would prefer that (investigation) be done by a non-military agency."

It is hard to get residents here to speak on the record about the warehouse, because they say they fear the army or drug gangs who carry out kidnappings, extortion and murder and move openly in the area.

Days after the shooting, AP reporters in San Pedro Limon saw two youths dressed in jeans, T-shirts and black ammo belts, with AK-47 rifles at the ready standing guard beside a white SUV with tinted windows, and two more armed men inside, on the main street of San Pedro, just a few hundred yards from where state prosecutors were taping off the warehouse.

After the men drove away, townspeople who had been standing just a few feet away claimed not to even have seen the armed men.

Asked if the road ahead was safe, one truck-taxi driver who lives in the nearby town of Amatepec, noted that travelers were likely to be stopped by armed men on the road.

"They'll ask where you're from and what you're doing here. Tell them you're visiting relatives," said the man, helpfully supplying the name of a relative to back up the story.

"I also find that remarkable," said U.N

SAN PEDRO LIMON, Mexico - Bullet marks and blood spatters on the walls inside a grain storage warehouse deep in the mountains of southern Mexico tell a grim story of death involving soldiers and alleged criminals. It may not be the same story officials tell, 김천출장마사지 - https://www.anmaweb.com/%ea%b9%80%ec%b2%9c%ec%98%a4%ed%94%bc%ea%b1%b8%e2... however.

Mexico's Defense Department says soldiers were patrolling in one of the most violent, lawless corners of the country on June 30 when they came under fire from a warehouse where a gang of 21 men and one woman were hiding. One soldier was wounded, but all of the suspects were killed.

The shootout was the most dramatic in a string of battles in which the army says criminals fired first at soldiers who then killed them all, while suffering few or no losses. There have been so many such incidents that human rights groups and analysts have begun to doubt the military's version.

"It raises suspicion, the simple fact that there were 22 dead on one side and one wounded on the other side," said security analyst Alejandro Hope, a former official in Mexico's domestic intelligence service.

In San Pedro Limon, pools of blood and bullet marks observed by Associated Press journalists three days after the shooting raise questions about whether all the suspects died in the gunbattle, or after it was over. The warehouse where many bodies were found showed little evidence of sustained fighting.

One witness who lives near the warehouse said he heard almost two hours of automatic gunfire and loud bangs during the pre-dawn hours of June 30. But he couldn't say if it came from the warehouse or from the forested hillsides around it. The man, who did not want to be identified for fear of reprisals, said he saw soldiers searching the hillsides after the shooting stopped.

Despite that heavy gunfire, only about six incoming rounds appeared to have hit the facade of the warehouse, the only part of the building with a window or door where soldiers likely would have been firing at people holed up inside.

There also were also no signs of continuous shooting inside the building, few bullet marks and no casings. But there was ample evidence of death. The floor was stained with pools of drying blood and scattered with pieces of numbered paper left by investigators to mark where cadavers were found.

At least five spots along the warehouse's inside walls showed the same pattern: One or two closely placed bullet pocks, surrounded by a mass of spattered blood, giving the appearance that some of those killed were standing against the wall and were hit by one or two shots at about chest level.

The distance at which the fatal shots were fired has not made public by the Mexico State prosecutor's office, which is carrying out the autopsies. A state official said the office could not release the cause of death because it is a federal case, but a federal official denied that. Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak on the record.

The Mexican Defense Department did not respond to requests for comment.

Two observers of the United Nations' High Commission on Human Rights, who inspected the warehouse just moments before state authorities closed it off with police "no entry" tape, noted that they found no signs of stray bullets of the type that would be left by soldiers shooting automatic weapons from a distance.

Nor did they see signs of outgoing fire from within the warehouse.

"I also find that remarkable," said U.N. observer Tom Haeck, adding that no conclusions had yet been drawn, and that any report would be for U.N. internal use.

Scattered around the earthen floor of the warehouse were notebook paper investigators left to mark where the bodies had been found; most were close to the walls. There were also toothbrushes, medications and empty food containers, suggesting people had camped out there.

Employees of the Mexico State medical examiners' office, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the press, said the dead were mostly youths between the ages of 16 and 24, and were from neighboring Guerrero state. It's home to a drug gang known as Guerreros Unidos, which reportedly is battling the Michoacan-state-based La Familia cartel for control of drug routes in the area. Officials have declined to say which gang might have been involved with the warehouse.

The Mexican army's rules of engagement allow soldiers to fire on armed civilians only if the civilians fire first. In some cases there is evidence that heavily armed drug gangs have attacked the military. A convoy of troops and police came under fire on May 16 in Michoacan state; four soldiers were killed and several wounded. The military said two soldiers died in another Michoacan ambush in January. Five soldiers died in a 2007 ambush in the same state.

But far more common of late are cases in which soldiers say they came under fire and only the attackers were killed.

The army reported a May 8 clash in Zacatecas state in which troops killed seven armed men without taking casualties. In four cases in the span of a week in late April, officials said federal forces killed 12 men who attacked them, but suffered no casualties - http://blogs.realtown.com/search/?q=casualties themselves. The army said troops killed 11 other alleged hit men who fired on them in the northern border state of Tamaulipas in 2010.

Hope, the security analyst, said he certainly doesn't want any more dead among the military. But in the case of San Pedro Limon, "it is important for there to be a thorough investigation, to dispel doubts or punish anyone who should be punished. I would prefer that (investigation) be done by a non-military agency."

It is hard to get residents here to speak on the record about the warehouse, because they say they fear the army or drug gangs who carry out kidnappings, extortion and murder and move openly in the area.

Days after the shooting, AP reporters in San Pedro Limon saw two youths dressed in jeans, T-shirts and black ammo belts, with AK-47 rifles at the ready standing guard beside a white SUV with tinted windows, and two more armed men inside, on the main street of San Pedro, just a few hundred yards from where state prosecutors were taping off the warehouse.

After the men drove away, townspeople who had been standing just a few feet away claimed not to even have seen the armed men.

Asked if the road ahead was safe, one truck-taxi driver who lives in the nearby town of Amatepec, noted that travelers were likely to be stopped by armed men on the road.

"They'll ask where you're from and what you're doing here. Tell them you're visiting relatives," said the man, helpfully supplying the name of a relative to back up the story.

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